dementia

(redirected from dementias)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to dementias: prescient, nascent, senile dementia

de·men·tia

 (dĭ-mĕn′shə)
n.
Loss of cognitive abilities, including memory, concentration, communication, planning, and abstract thinking, resulting from brain injury or from a disease such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. It is sometimes accompanied by emotional disturbance and personality changes.

[Latin dēmentia, madness, from dēmēns, dēment-, senseless; see dement.]

de·men′tial adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dementia

(dɪˈmɛnʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
(Pathology) a state of serious emotional and mental deterioration, of organic or functional origin
[C19: from Latin: madness; see dement]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•men•tia

(dɪˈmɛn ʃə, -ʃi ə)

n.
severely impaired memory and reasoning ability, usu. with disturbed behavior, associated with damaged brain tissue.
[1800–10; < Latin dēmentia madness <dē- de- + mēns mind + -ia -ia]
de•men′tial, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dementia

madness or insanity. Cf. amentia.
See also: Insanity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dementia - mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
insanity - relatively permanent disorder of the mind
alcohol amnestic disorder, alcoholic dementia, Korsakoff's psychosis, Korsakoff's syndrome, Korsakov's psychosis, Korsakov's syndrome, polyneuritic psychosis - dementia observed during the last stages of severe chronic alcoholism; involves loss of memory for recent events although long term memory is intact
presenile dementia - dementia with onset before the age of 65
senile dementia, senile psychosis - dementia of the aged; results from degeneration of the brain in the absence of cerebrovascular disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dementia

noun
Serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely:
Psychiatry: mania.
Psychology: aberration, alienation.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
demence
demens
dementia
demencijasilpnaprotystė
demens

dementia

[dɪˈmenʃɪə] Ndemencia f
senile dementiademencia f senil
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃiə dɪˈmɛnʃə] ndémence fdemerara sugar [ˌdɛmərɛərəˈʃʊgər] (British) nsucre m roux, cassonade f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dementia

nSchwachsinn m, → Demenz f (spec); dementia praecoxJugendirresein nt, → Dementia praecox f (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃɪə] n (Med) → demenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

de·men·ti·a

n. demencia, locura; declinación de las funciones mentales;
___ paralytica___ paralítica;
___ praecox___ precoz, esquizofrenia;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dementia

n demencia; Alzheimer’s — demencia de Alzheimer, demencia tipo Alzheimer; — pugilistica demencia pugilística; multi-infarct — (ant) demencia vascular, demencia multiinfarto (ant); vascular — demencia vascular
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
His concluding smile was positively ghastly, and his eyes had resumed something more than their old restlessness; they shifted hither and thither about the room with apparent aimlessness and I fancied had taken on a wild expression, such as is sometimes observed in cases of dementia. Perhaps this was my own imagination, but at any rate I was now persuaded that my friend was afflicted with a most singular and interesting monomania.
38-9), imbecility and dementia still have to be considered physiologically, as caused by defects in the brain.
When there is no punishment at all, crime will either cease to exist, or, if it occurs, will be treated by physicians as a very distressing form of dementia, to be cured by care and kindness.
Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2016, making it the 5th leading cause of global death in 2016, compared to 14th in 2000.
Unfortunately, there are no cures for progressive dementias that are linked to plaque tangles in the brain and changes in the way the brain processes the protein alpha-synuclein.
LEADING scientists, led by Cardiff University Professor Julie Williams called on the government for a three-fold increase in dementia research in an effort to find new treatments, preventions and cures for Alzheimer's and other dementias.
In an analysis of incidence rates that controlled for other cardiovascular risk factors, patients with AF generally had an increased risk for all types of dementias, compared with matched people without AF.
Even people who reach age 80 free of Alzheimer's disease or other dementias stand a good chance of later developing some form of mental incapacity, says a team led by epidemiologist Carol Brayne of the University of Cambridge in England.
First, the patient declined rapidly, which is unusual in common dementias. Second, a mild CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis is consistent with an infectious or inflammatory CNS disorder, though rare occurrences have been reported in pathologically confirmed Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) (12).
The vascular dementia criteria do not consider mixed dementias or silent strokes.
We must never forget that caring for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias involves more than what I call "body care." Because of the way long-term care is funded, we are forced to focus on ADLs a great deal.