demerit

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de·mer·it

 (dĭ-mĕr′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A quality or characteristic deserving of blame or censure; a fault.
b. Absence of merit.
2. A mark made against one's record for a fault or for misconduct.

[Middle English demerite, offense, from Old French desmerite, from Latin dēmeritum, from neuter past participle of dēmerēre, to deserve : dē-, de- + merēre, to earn; see (s)mer- in Indo-European roots.]

de·mer′i·to′ri·ous (-tôr′ē-əs) adj.
de·mer′i·to′ri·ous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

demerit

(diːˈmɛrɪt; ˈdiːˌmɛrɪt)
n
1. something, esp conduct, that deserves censure
2. (Education) US and Canadian a mark given against a person for failure or misconduct, esp in schools or the armed forces
3. (Military) US and Canadian a mark given against a person for failure or misconduct, esp in schools or the armed forces
4. a fault or disadvantage
[C14 (originally: worth, later specialized to mean: something worthy of blame): from Latin dēmerērī to deserve]
deˌmeriˈtorious adj
deˌmeriˈtoriously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•mer•it

(dɪˈmɛr ɪt)

n.
1. a mark against a person for misconduct or deficiency.
2. the quality of being censurable; fault; culpability.
3. Obs. offense.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Old French desmerite) < Medieval Latin dēmeritum fault, n. use of neuter past participle of Latin dēmerēre to earn, win the favor of (dē- taken in Medieval Latin as privative, hence pejorative). See de-, merit]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demerit - a mark against a person for misconduct or failure; usually given in school or armed forces; "ten demerits and he loses his privileges"
stigma, stain, brand, mark - a symbol of disgrace or infamy; "And the Lord set a mark upon Cain"--Genesis
2.demerit - the quality of being inadequate or falling short of perfection; "they discussed the merits and demerits of her novel"; "he knew his own faults much better than she did"
worth - the quality that renders something desirable or valuable or useful
merit, virtue - any admirable quality or attribute; "work of great merit"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

demerit

[diːˈmerɪt] N (usu pl) → demérito m, desmerecimiento m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

demerit

[diːˈmɛrɪt] n (= weak point) → démérite m
the demerits of sb/sth → les démérites de qn/qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

demerit

nSchwäche f, → Fehler m; (dated US: = black mark) → Minuspunkt m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

demerit

[diːˈmɛrɪt] n (frm) → difetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite all these advantages the demeritorious part is the requirement of advanced laparoscopic surgical skills with a learning curve of 100 cases; the method carries a long-term failure rate of 10-15%.
Here, too, it is demeritorious to change from male to female when this happens in a society where females find themselves in a disadvantageous position because of their sex.
The Directors were also advised to ensure disciplinary action against those unqualified on the basis of their demeritorious activities.