demimondaine


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dem·i·mon·daine

 (dĕm′ē-mŏn-dān′, -mŏn′dān′)
n.
A woman belonging to the demimonde.

[French, from demi-monde, demimonde; see demimonde.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

demimondaine

(ˌdɛmɪˈmɒndeɪn; French dəmimɔ̃dɛn)
n
(Sociology) a woman of the demimonde
[C19: from French]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dem•i•mon•daine

(ˌdɛm i mɒnˈdeɪn)

n.
a woman who belongs to the demimonde.
[1890–95; < French, =demimonde demimonde]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demimondaine - a woman whose sexual promiscuity places her outside respectable society
demimonde - a class of woman not considered respectable because of indiscreet or promiscuous behavior
cocotte, cyprian, fancy woman, lady of pleasure, sporting lady, tart, woman of the street, working girl - a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
demi-mondaindemi-mondaine
References in periodicals archive ?
IN JULES DASSINS 1960 COMEDY NEVER ON Sunday Melina Mercouri's Piraeus demimondaine weeps at the awful denouement of "Medea," but cheers up when the actors take their curtain call.
It was in the same atmosphere as that of Cervantes's times, after the religion of the mind reigned with exaggerated self-confidence, that Romanticism "discovered" Don Quixote and Hamlet, just as in our times, surfeited with positivism yet unable to refute it entirely, the numerous philosophical and pseudo-philosophical systems like William James's pragmatism, Bergson's demimondaine philosophy, the tragic hedonism of Unamuno, and vitalisms and existentialisms of various sorts, consider our desperate hidalgo the true and prime guide.
Also in attendance was the demimondaine Harriette Wilson who was accompanied by a friend cross-dressed as "an Italian or Austrian peasant-boy." (33) Wilson particularly admired the costumes of Colonel Armstrong, attired as "an old, stiff maiden-lady of high rank in the reign of Queen Ann," and Byron's friend Douglas Kinnaird, who maintained throughout the evening the role of a "Yorkshirenran in search of a place." (34) The climax of Wilson's account describes her coming upon Byron alone and unmasked in a room, sitting on one of the ottomans that would be transformed in Dibdin's pantomime.
In "Men-of-the-World and demimondaines: Gender Representation and Construction in Villiers de l'Isle-Adam," Pierre Zoberman examines and the way the figures of the "demimondaine" and of the "man-of-the-world" and their interactions in Villiers de l'Isle-Adam, contribute to a complex representation of both masculinity and femininity.
707 Scott Street's poems and prose about scoring drugs, scoring (or not) sex, feeling abandoned, getting high, wandering the neighborhoods and the business districts, evoke an ethereal, disoriented, anguished sense of solitude, loneliness, and a peculiar kind of (un)belonging in relation to urban San Francisco and its demimondaine institutions (cheap ethnic restaurants, boarding houses, cafes, all-night diners, cruisy intersections) as well as business districts and bookstores, in which alienation and the longing to undo it become normative if never comfortable states.
Incluso se baten en duelo por una mujer como La Colombe, una demimondaine francesa que ha conocido tiempos mejores, y que pasa de mano en mano.
"A TORRID EYE" (ED #872) A demimondaine's Demand-- Kohl-dark, jet-dark-- A Jeanne d'Arc look-- The koh-i-noor's-- Start--Or a black Diamond's heart-- A star Diamond Mine's Depth-- Deep as her Mind's Own Word-hoard mined For half-whored Words-- Adored--redeemed-- By whom they deemed All but damned.
Nazi Germany's British defenders included the treacherous Lloyd George, who kept wailing for a peace treaty with Hitler during the darkest days of the Blitz, and the loathsome Edward, Duke of Windsor, who gave up the British crown for a divorced demimondaine and went on a tour of Germany, where he ostentatiously gave Nazi salutes and fawned over Hitler.
The tenant, one Ms de Florian, a 'demimondaine' left her home during World War II and never returned.
And in Winnipeg there is really only one cafe in summer and then many which aspire to be it--that's Bar Italia, the closest thing to Jazz Age-vintage Les Deux Magots this lively Fragile-X community can create from its gallery of demimondaine, flaneurs, artists, and professionals.
When the Goncourts protest the lorette's glamorization, they not only signal her demise, but also announce the arrival of the demimondaine, the deviant mangeuse d'hommes who will replace her.
She did not rebel against middle-class values; she helped to change them, so that by 1904 a "woman of the world" could be a sympathetic advisor rather than a demimondaine.