democratism


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Related to democratism: republicanism

democratism

a doctrine of or belief in social equality or the right of all people to participate equally in politics.
See also: Freedom, Politics, Society
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(10) This is what Ekeh refers to as democratism, which, according to him, is the brand of rule that makes use of 'false principles of the institutions of democracy' while at the same time creating anti-democratic conditions.
In the contemporary era, neoconservative notions of democratism
333-345; Ders.: Nationalism sau Democratism, Tirgu Mures 1999, S.
By attaching words that refer to democracy to practices which are non-democratic, democratism creates a distorted and oversimplified idea of what democracy is and how it works; the term then serves as an ideological label to approve any acts performed by whoever is in charge, rather than a description of a system of government in which major decisions are made by public vote.
Just as Americans incorporated royalty into their republican constitution in the figure of the president (Pocock, 1988), so they took over English aristocratic landscaping to transform it into horticultural democratism. Three founding fathers were lawnmakers: Washington, Jefferson, and Hamilton.
It is a disappointing weakness that Williamson has nothing to say about Lincoln's great critique of Stephen Douglas's amoral democratism or majoritarianism in the 1858 Illinois debates, about which Harry V.
In merely 271 words, the wartime president fused his epoch's most powerful and disruptive tendencies--nationalism, democratism, and German idealism--into a civil religion indebted to the language of Christianity but devoid of its content.
Another is the sentimental temptation, exaggerated by democratism, to glorify the sufferer, to view him as if he had chosen his own suffering in order to sanctify the rest of us--which, if such were indeed the case, would make humanitarian intervention on his behalf a contradiction in terms, as if the witnesses to the Crucifixion had lifted the dying Christ down from the Cross.
This index serves as a fitting point of departure for "Monument to Capital," the two-part project that anchors "Art After Democratism," Jonas Staal's first solo exhibition in Dubai, a city whose most improbable architecture--including the current record-holder for the highest building, the Burj Khalifa--appeared in a moment of crisis within the global economy.
Not only is it and aspect of deepening democratism in the life of the state, but also a proof for the evolution of civic responsability--in all of its valences: juridical, moral, political--of all members of society, including the state organs." (7)
According to Mikhail Gorbachev, the president of Moscow, "The status of women is a barometer of democratism of any state and indicator of how human rights are respected in it" (cited.
(51) The paper (whose title alluded to Maksimovich's earlier venture), aimed to acquaint readers across the empire with the unique history and special needs of the southwestern borderlands, raising awareness of the cultural traditions of the Little Russian people--and their continued suffering under the "triple yoke of Catholic clergy, Poles (landlords, rentiers, and estate managers) and Jews." (52) Reflecting the "radical democratism" that prevailed among Kiev's Ukrainophile intelligentsia, the paper published historical retrospectives of the role that Hromada members had played in combating Polish influence and lauded Dragomanov's ethnographic research (indeed, the young scholaractivist was a founding member of the paper's editorial board).