democratizer

democratizer

(dɪˈmɒkrəˌtaɪzə) or

democratiser

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person or thing that democratizes
References in periodicals archive ?
All of this is being made available via the internet of things, which is a great democratizer and is playing a critical role providing safe, secure and accessible digital ecosystems", says Jorn Lambert, Executive Vice President, Digital Solutions at Mastercard.
All of this is being made available via the internet of things, which is a great democratizer and is playing a critical role providing safe, secure and accessible digital ecosystems, says Jorn Lambert, Executive Vice President, Digital Solutions at Mastercard.
It becomes increasingly clear, too, as Hartley elucidates his position that he was no democratizer. His vision of beauty was both highly gendered (though, to be fair, the same turns out to be true of all the figures she studies) and dismissive of the need to create art that can be appreciated by "minds incapable of large sympathies" (161), which seems to mean those outside an educated artistic elite.
The hashtag serves as a democratizer of speech, allowing anyone to have her thoughts distributed for free around the world.
Thus, his argument for paying reparations to blacks is less about economic equality than moral clarity, Reparations "is the price we must pay to see ourselves squarely," the only way we can fully accept "our collective biography and its consequences" and thereby "imagine a new country." Deliberating and then paying reparations would constitute a "national reckoning that would lead to spiritual renewal," a "revolution of the American consciousness," and "a reconciling of our self-image as the great democratizer with the facts of our history." According to Between the World and Me, the American Dream is not an aspiration but a comforting, exculpatory fantasy.
It is the great democratizer, because anyone can afford a KFC meal; even top chefs can be found huddled in the neighborhood branch after dinner service.
But here's the great democratizer: Whether you're fresh out of school and willing to relocate or looking to work remotely in semi-retirement, your job search will always be more successful if you're actively beefing up the skills a potential employer deems integral to the running of his or her business.
"The Internet is the worst nightmare of the Chinese leadership because it is the great democratizer of information," she said.
Elsewhere in Asia, the Church was also a strong democratizer: in South Korea, it joined Protestant Churches in mounting public protests against the dictatorship of President Park Chung Hee; in East Timor, a Church that was once a partner to the colonial Portuguese state became, under the leadership of Bishop Carolos Ximenes Belo, a key leader in the struggle for independence from Indonesia and the establishment of democracy.
I'm wondering if you can direct me to something that refutes, in a nutshell, the idea that public schooling is the "Great Democratizer." I have a neighbor who fancies himself a "socialist" and, in fact, we share views on many topics; however he likens homeschooling to school vouchers for the elite.
Baseball was the great democratizer, a place where men earned their place on the team not because of rank, or social class, but because of skill," he said, gesturing to the starch white shirt hovering above them.
Concerning both function and availability of education, in modern universities, education is seen as the great democratizer, available to anyone regardless of social standing, due to scholarships, grants, student loans and such; whereas the medieval university, although not dominated by aristocrats until the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries, was not nevertheless open to the poor until the college movement provided room and board for poorer students, which began in the late twelfth century.