demythologizer


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de·my·thol·o·gize

 (dē′mĭ-thŏl′ə-jīz′)
tr.v. de·my·thol·o·gized, de·my·thol·o·giz·ing, de·my·thol·o·giz·es
1. To rid of mythological elements in order to discover the underlying meaning: demythologize biblical legends.
2. To remove the mysterious or mythical aspects from: "providing an antiheroic age with heroes suitably demythologized, yet also grand" (John Simon).

de′my·thol′o·gi·za′tion (-jĭ-zā′shən) n.
de′my·thol′o·giz′er n.

demythologizer

(ˌdiːmɪˈθɒləˌdʒaɪzə) or

demythologiser

n
a person who removes mythical elements from something
References in periodicals archive ?
Saki regularly taught West and Mailer and believed that West was a profoundly Jewish writer, a crucial figure with whom he identified, indeed with whom he felt a deep affiliation as an outsider; as demythologizer of all dominant, and dominating ideologies; as a humorist in the tradition of Kafka, Sholem Aleichem, and Mark Twain (all of whom Bercovitch wrote about).
They don't match the mythological and astrological view of Mars (science is such a brutal demythologizer), but this latest successful Mars landing again fuels interest in looking beyond earth into the vast magnificence of our solar system.
In this sense, satellite television plays the role of "cultural demythologizer" by freeing immigrants from clinging to the past.
Reading Hawthorne as another demythologizer, Baker would concur with Michael Colacurcio's portrayal of Hawthorne as a "moral historian." Yet, whereas Colacurcio considers Hawthorne a historian "primarily in the sense that the intention which reveals itself in the best of the early tales is the wish to recover the affective quality of human lives lived under conditions or assumptions different from those which prevailed in his later and more liberal age," Baker focuses less on affect and milieu than on Hawthorne's insistence upon ethical accountability.
For Girard and Ciuba, Jesus is the demythologizer of violent culture and was the ultimate scapegoat.
An uninterrupted consumer enthusiasm for triumphal tellings of western history was its own useful stimulus for putting the tools of the debunker and demythologizer into deep storage.
In its compulsion to tell stories about the past, while doubting their factual historical truth, Historijska citanka is on the one hand a seductive mythologization of the pre-war Sarajevo and, on the other, its own doubting and self-conscious demythologizer, often talking with a sense of wonder or irony about things that in the past would have been considered as perfectly normal.
Yeats was a mythologizer and Foster is a demythologizer, but otherwise the encounter between them in this book proves remarkably productive.