denazification


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Noun1.denazification - social process of removing Nazis from official positions and giving up any allegiance to Nazism; "denazification was a slow process"
social process - a process involved in the formation of groups of persons
Translations
dénazification

denazification

References in periodicals archive ?
After the war Hildebrand lied about his activities to the denazification tribunal in Bamberg about his activities, presenting himself as an unwilling employee of the Nazi regime.
Hence in Germany, it diluted denazification, returned local governance to Germans, tolerated a small Communist Party, and sustained "relatively friendly" relations with Soviet counterparts more than many civilians in Washington wanted (160).
World War II's conquering nations' condemnation included denazification and bringing Holocaust perpetrators to trial and punishing them through lengthy sentences and execution.
The need for justice weighed heavily on the Allies, especially the United States, which desperately wanted to show the German people it was fair in the use of its laws and in the denazification program, while also making the worst Nazis pay for their crimes with their lives.
After the war, as part of the denazification programme, the Bavarian government was given the copyright of Mein Kampf.
Allied control was tight as a noose around the German neck while denazification proceeded from the Nuremberg trials to punish all Germans regardless of guilt or innocence.
More than likely, a version of the denazification program applied to some war prisoners in view of their transformation into combatants against their own armies (47).
18) See "World War II Aftermath in Germany: Denazification," accessed online at: http://histclo.
After the war Galen would protest against denazification.
World War II, Austria was spared the formalities of denazification after
There are lines in the chapter on the denazification of Carl Schmitt--who is probably the most intellectually eminent individual discussed in the book, but whose eminence leaves Sollors, by his own admission (the price of decency?
Remy, The Heidelberg Myth: The Nazification and Denazification of a German University (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002); and Konrad H.