denominator


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de·nom·i·na·tor

 (dĭ-nŏm′ə-nā′tər)
n.
1. Mathematics The expression written below the line in a common fraction that indicates the number of parts into which one whole is divided.
2. A common trait or characteristic.
3. A determining factor or standard: "The tie is probably the single most important denominator of social status for a man in the United States today" (John Molloy).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

denominator

(dɪˈnɒmɪˌneɪtə)
n
1. (Mathematics) the divisor of a fraction, as 8 in . Compare numerator1
2. archaic a person or thing that denominates or designates
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•nom•i•na•tor

(dɪˈnɒm əˌneɪ tər)

n.
1. the term of a fraction, usu. written under or after the line, that indicates the number of equal parts into which the unit is divided; divisor. Compare numerator (def. 1).
2. something held in common; standard.
[1535–45; < Medieval Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·nom·i·na·tor

(dĭ-nŏm′ə-nā′tər)
The number below or to the right of the line in a fraction, indicating the number of equal parts into which one whole is divided. For example, in the fraction 2/7 , 7 is the denominator.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.denominator - the divisor of a fraction
divisor - the number by which a dividend is divided
common denominator - an integer that is a common multiple of the denominators of two or more fractions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
jmenovatel
nævner
nimittäjä
nämnare

denominator

[dɪˈnɒmɪneɪtəʳ] N (Math) → denominador m
see also common C
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

denominator

[dɪˈnɒmɪneɪtər] n (MATHEMATICS)dénominateur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

denominator

n (Math) → Nenner m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

denominator

[dɪˈnɒmɪˌneɪtəʳ] n (Math) → denominatore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
An improper fraction is a fraction whose numerator is larger than its denominator, and whose value is greater than a whole unit.
To appeal to a much wider consumer base, beer--like other products--was retooled to appeal to the lowest common denominator. Brewing history is littered with the losers of this period.
416 illustrates the calculation and how an adjustment to the numerator and/or denominator ensures the taxpayer does not receive an FTC greater than the Federal income taxes paid on the foreign-source income.
The problems come when one tries to attach specific numbers to the possibilities: the vast majority of those in the "unemployed" category are in both the numerator and denominator; only a small part of the employed would be looking for another job--they have strong comparative advantages in what they are doing now.
After learning the above LAP mnemonic, the students practiced pointing to the bottom number or denominator of a given fraction.
The common denominator I regret to state is that the North Wales Police have not been able to bring the culprits to justice (unless there have been announcements in the Press contrary that I have missed).
The problem with batting average, though, is that the denominator, official at-bats, excludes walks, hit-by-pitch situations and sacrifice hits.
He spoke of the International Accounting Standards (IAS) to take effect beginning in January 2005, saying, "IAS are a fact, and we are going to live with convergence [with the U.S.]." He noted that the process itself is "raising all the posts [by] trying to bring all up to a higher standard [rather than] searching for a common denominator."
In designing a system of any type, where there is a range of requirements that need to be met to satisfy a number of diverse customers, it always helps to start at the least common denominator and then add where necessary to satisfy the more demanding requirements.
However, flatness is not the only common denominator of fine and applied, of painterly and photographic; just as salient is Overby's almost obscenely lush treatment of lipsticks, facial masks, and ointments as tautological figures for paint.
Nevertheless,, the specified method of dropping the certainty stratum and strata with high sampling rates from the denominator of the calculation does not represent good statistics and may even provide an incentive for bad sample design by discouraging some of the best methods of control of sampling variability, namely larger certainty and high sampling rate strata.
The leader must be one with the resources to act swiftly to find a common Arab denominator so that a collective Arab leadership can come up with an offer for the stabilisation of Iraq, an offer which the Bush administration cannot refuse in this year of US presidential elections.