denotation

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Related to denotations: Denotative meaning

de·no·ta·tion

 (dē′nō-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of denoting; indication.
2. Something, such as a sign or symbol, that denotes.
3. Something signified or referred to; a particular meaning of a symbol.
4. The most specific or direct meaning of a word, in contrast to its figurative or associated meanings.

denotation

(ˌdiːnəʊˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of denoting; indication
2. a particular meaning, esp one given explicitly rather than by suggestion
3. (Linguistics)
a. something designated or referred to. Compare referent, connotation
b. another name for extension11

de•no•ta•tion

(ˌdi noʊˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the explicit or direct meaning or set of meanings of a word or expression, as distinguished from the ideas or meanings associated with or suggested by it. Compare connotation (def. 2).
2. the act or fact of denoting; indication.
3. a word that names or denotes something.
4. a mark, sign, or symbol; indicator.
[1525–35; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.denotation - the act of indicating or pointing out by name
naming - the verbal act of naming; "the part he failed was the naming of state capitals"
2.denotation - the most direct or specific meaning of a word or expression; the class of objects that an expression refers to; "the extension of `satellite of Mars' is the set containing only Demos and Phobos"
meaning, substance - the idea that is intended; "What is the meaning of this proverb?"

denotation

noun
That which is signified by a word or expression:
Translations
jeljelentésmegjelölés

denotation

[ˌdiːnəʊˈteɪʃən] N
1. (gen) → denotación f (also Ling, Philos); (= meaning) → sentido m
2. (= symbol) → símbolo m, señal f

denotation

n
(Philos, of term, concept) → Denotation f, → Begriffsumfang m; (of word)Bedeutung f
(= name: of object) → Bezeichnung f; (= symbol)Symbol nt
References in classic literature ?
So long a period naturally falls into sub-divisions; during its middle part in particular, progress and triumphant romanticism, not yet largely attacked by scientific scepticism, had created a prevailing atmosphere of somewhat passive sentiment and optimism both in society and in literature which has given to the adjective 'mid-Victorian' a very definite denotation. The adjective and its period are commonly spoken of with contempt in our own day by those persons who pride themselves on their complete sophistication and superiority to all intellectual and emotional weakness.
In choosing semantic denotations instead, Kaplan makes his propositional ambiguity intriguingly elusive.
In this book Dr van Eck seeks to show that `the topographical references in Mark's gospel, such as Galilee, Jerusalem, house, the temple and "the way" can be seen not only as denotations of social interests and/or institutions, but also as metaphors/symbols that reflect a specific understanding of the symbolic universe'; and `that the way in which Galilee and Jerusalem are structured in the gospel, seen from the narrator's ideological point of view, has certain political undertones'.
The distinction can be readily described by referring to the equation of exchange MV = PY, where variables have the standard denotations. According to Green the classical school took Y to be fixed by Say's Law and V to be externally given.
Yet his denotations of liberalization do not escape the dichotomy (connoted by privatization) of a public, as opposed to a private, sector.
Because a literary work may be the product of writing done over a period of time, the meanings that are sometimes assigned to the text may gloss over time-sensitive denotations and connotations: "changes in the author's world between ...
His theory predicts that Japanese and Korean bare nouns denote kinds and come out of the lexicon with mass denotations. In the present work, I will discuss the following two crucial differences between conventional mass nouns like the English furniture and Japanese/Korean bare nominal arguments.
He cautions that words which now describe "innerness"--individual, identity, self, and so on--either did not exist in the Renaissance or had not acquired their modern denotations. Thus, Shakespeare, Lee maintains, often uses metaphor to represent interiority.
The invocation of Black Speak evokes a "meta-discourse" of discemable significations, connotations, and denotations (see Gates) that transcends the oratory and signals "true" communication.
Maximin's poetry resembles Verlaine's more than Rimbaud's in that it is above all musical; the sounds of the words are more important than their denotations; themes are suggested and evolve according to harmonies of sound rather than logical patterns.
As observers, able to identify the denotations of definite descriptions(14) which she employs, we can consider her and her surrounding environment from a bird's eye viewpoint, and ask: when does she refer to an object in using a given term, and to which object?
Key to the riddle is the verb manier, often used in reference to lute-playing in Renaissance texts without any particular implications beyond the common denotations: to use, to handle, to manipulate or wield.