erosion

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Related to dental erosion: dental abrasion

e·ro·sion

 (ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
1. The group of natural processes, including weathering, dissolution, abrasion, corrosion, and transportation, by which material is worn away from the earth's surface.
2. The superficial destruction of bodily tissue by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.
3. The process of eroding or the condition of being eroded: erosion of confidence in the governor; erosion of the value of the dollar.

[Latin ērōsiō, ērōsiōn-, an eating away, from ērōsus, eaten away; see erose.]

e·ro′sion·al adj.
e·ro′sion·al·ly adv.

erosion

(ɪˈrəʊʒən)
n
1. (Geological Science) the wearing away of rocks and other deposits on the earth's surface by the action of water, ice, wind, etc
2. the act or process of eroding or the state of being eroded
eˈrosive, eˈrosional adj

e•ro•sion

(ɪˈroʊ ʒən)

n.
1. the act or process of eroding.
2. the state of being eroded.
3. the process by which the surface of the earth is worn away by the action of water, glaciers, winds, waves, etc.
[1535–45; < Latin ērōsiō. See erode, -tion]
e•ro′sion•al, adj.

e·ro·sion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
The gradual wearing away of land surface materials, especially rocks, sediments, and soils, by the action of water, wind, or a glacier. Usually erosion also involves the transfer of eroded material from one place to another, as from the top of a mountain to an adjacent valley, or from the upstream portion of a river to the downstream portion.

erosion

The removal of loose mineral particles by wind, water, and moving ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
chatter mark - marks on a glaciated rock caused by the movement of a glacier
ablation - the erosive process that reduces the size of glaciers
attrition, corrasion, detrition, abrasion - erosion by friction
beach erosion - the erosion of beaches
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
deflation - (geology) the erosion of soil as a consequence of sand and dust and loose rocks being removed by the wind; "a constant deflation of the desert landscape"
planation - the process of erosion whereby a level surface is produced
soil erosion - the washing away of soil by the flow of water
2.erosion - condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind
environmental condition - the state of the environment
3.erosion - a gradual decline of something; "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
4.erosion - erosion by chemical action
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
pitting, indentation, roughness - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
rusting, rust - the formation of reddish-brown ferric oxides on iron by low-temperature oxidation in the presence of water

erosion

noun
1. disintegration, deterioration, corrosion, corrasion, wearing down or away, grinding down erosion of the river valleys
2. deterioration, wearing, undermining, destruction, consumption, weakening, spoiling, attrition, eating away, abrasion, grinding down, wearing down or away an erosion of moral standards
Translations
تأكُّل، تآكُل، تَعْرِيَه
eroze
erosionudhulning
eroosiokuluminensyöpyminen
erozija
erózió
veîrun, eyîing, uppblástur
erózia
aşın maerozyon

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] N
1. (Geol) → erosión f; [of metal] → corrosión f
2. (fig) → desgaste m

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] n
[soil, rock] → érosion f
[freedom, confidence] → érosion f

erosion

n (by water, glaciers, rivers) → Erosion f, → Abtragung f; (by acid) → Ätzung f; (fig, of love etc) → Schwinden nt; (of power, values, beliefs)Untergrabung f; (of authority)Unterminierung f; (of differentials)Aushöhlen nt; (of value)Abtragung f, → Untergrabung f; an erosion of confidence in the poundein Vertrauensverlust mor -schwund mdes Pfundes

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒn] n (see vb) → erosione f, corrosione f

erode

(iˈrəud) verb
to eat or wear away (metals etc); to destroy gradually. Acids erode certain metals; Water has eroded the rock; The individual's right to privacy is being eroded.
eˈrosion (-ʒən) noun

e·ro·sion

n. erosión, desgaste.

erosion

n erosión f
References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- The rising prevalence of dental erosion and dentin hypersensitivity has led to the emergence of more and more toothpastes on the market that claim to treat these problems.
Dental erosion resulting from chewable vitamin C tablets.
In Vitro Study of Dental Erosion associated to Chimo
Among the topics are polysaccharide based biomaterials, biopolymers in the prevention of dental erosion, biomedical applications of recombinant proteins and derived polypeptides, high-order perturbation theory models of drug-target interactomes for proteins expressed on networks of hippocampus brain region of Alzheimer disease patients, and the dynamic analysis of backbone-hydrogen-bond propensity for protein binding and drug design.
Unlike cavities, dental erosion is a process of incremental decalcification, which, over time, literally dissolves your teeth.
Dental erosion can result in dentinal hypersensitivity once the enamel or cementum has been eroded away.
5) Dental erosion is the loss of hard tooth structure due to acid destruction, the most common cause being dietary acids.
3,5,6,7,8) Acidic medications may cause dental erosion with loss of dental tissue.
Key words: Dental erosion, Enamel bonding, Pressed ceramic crown, Pressed ceramic laminate veneer
Dental erosion and severe tooth decay related to soft drinks: a case report and literature review.
More recent findings have demonstrated a significant association between energy drinks and dental erosion.