radiograph

(redirected from dental radiograph)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ra·di·o·graph

 (rā′dē-ō-grăf′)
n.
An image produced by radiation, usually by x-rays, and recorded on a radiosensitive surface, such as photographic film, or by photographing a fluoroscopic image. Also called radiogram, shadowgraph, skiagram, skiagraph.
tr.v. ra·di·o·graphed, ra·di·o·graph·ing, ra·di·o·graphs
To make a radiograph of.

ra′di·og′ra·pher (-ŏg′rə-fər) n.
ra′di·o·graph′ic adj.
ra′di·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

radiograph

(ˈreɪdɪəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
1. (Photography) an image produced on a specially sensitized photographic film or plate by radiation, usually by X-rays or gamma rays. Also called: radiogram or shadowgraph
2. (Medicine) an image produced on a specially sensitized photographic film or plate by radiation, usually by X-rays or gamma rays. Also called: radiogram or shadowgraph

ra•di•o•graph

(ˈreɪ di oʊˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
1. a photographic image produced by the action of x-rays or nuclear radiation.
v.t.
2. to make a radiograph of.
[1875–80]
ra`di•og′ra•phy (-ˈɒg rə fi) n.
ra`di•o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiograph - a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)radiograph - a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)
autoradiograph - a radiogram produced by radiation emitted by the specimen being photographed
photo, photograph, pic, exposure, picture - a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
roentgenogram, X-ray photograph, X-ray picture, X ray, X-ray - a radiogram made by exposing photographic film to X rays; used in medical diagnosis
Translations
صورَةٌ بالأشِعَّةِ السّينيَّه
rentgenový snímek
røntgenbillede
röntgenmynd
rentgeno nuotraukarentgenografijarentgenogramarentgenologas
radyografiröntgenle çekilen resim
X光照片射线照片

radiograph

[ˈreɪdɪəʊgrɑːf]
A. Nradiografía f
B. VTradiografiar

radiograph

nRadiogramm nt; (= X-ray)Röntgenogramm nt, → Röntgenbild nt

radiograph

(ˈreidiəgraːf) noun
a photograph taken by means of X-rays or other rays.
ˌradiˈographer (-ˈo-) noun
a person who makes such photographs.
radiˈography (-ˈo-) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
patients Characteristic (N = 20) (%) Median age, yrs * (range) 7 (3-11) NA Male 11 55 Asthma 3 15 Immunocompromised 0 0 Signs and symptoms Pain 17 85 Osteomyelitis 14 70 Facial swelling 12 60 Lymphadenopathy 10 50 Pulmonary nodules 7 35 Fever 1 5 Diagnostic evaluation Neck CT 17 85 Chest radiograph 11 55 Dental radiograph 8 40 Ultrasound 5 25 Maxillofacial CT 2 10 MRI 1 5 Treatment Excision 17 85 Outpatient IV antibiotics 10 50 by PICC ([dagger]) Incision or drainage 7 35 Laboratory result AFB stain negative 13 65 AFB stain positive 7 35 AFB culture positive 11 55 AFB culture negative 9 45 ([section]) Abbreviations: AFB = acid-fast bacteria; CT = computed tomography; IV = intravenous; MRI = magnetic resonance imaging; NA = not available; PICC = peripherally inserted central catheter.
pdf Dental Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Radiographs Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure Examinations http://www.
A dental radiograph taken 14 days after the announcement of the discovery of Roentgen rays with an exposure of 25 min resulted in hair loss to the side of the head imaged [2].
One recent guideline published within the author's country has suggested that where a narrow band of "normal" dentine can be seen on a dental radiograph between a carious lesion and the dental pulp and where the tooth is both clinically- and radiographically-free of signs of pulpal disease, then to manage the tooth without recourse to pulp treatment [NHS, Scotland, 2010].
The first dental radiograph was taken in January 1896 by Otto Walkhoff, D.
The dosage of radiation and the timing of gestation are two important factors to consider, and it is suggested that the second trimester is the optimal timing for taking a dental radiograph with the use of a lead apron and thyroid collar.
Department of Health and Human Services 2012 recommendations on dental radiograph examinations.
The findings indicate that patients are at risk for exposure to a substantial amount of lead during a dental radiograph procedure if the office stores dental film in these boxes.
When a dental radiograph is taken, the radiation penetrates body tissue.
The patient's radiation exposure is also reduced during the dental radiograph retake process.
One of the most important tools in diagnosing dental disease is a dental radiograph.