denunciatory


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Related to denunciatory: ne'er

de·nun·ci·a·tion

 (dĭ-nŭn′sē-ā′shən, -shē-)
n.
1. The act or an instance of denouncing, especially a public condemnation or censure.
2. The reporting of a person to the authorities for possible criminal prosecution.

[Middle English denunciacioun, from Latin dēnūntiātiō, dēnūntiātiōn-, from dēnūntiātus, past participle of dēnūntiāre, to announce; see denounce.]

de·nun′ci·a′tive (-ā′tĭv, -ə-tĭv), de·nun′ci·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

de•nun•ci•a•to•ry

(dɪˈnʌn si əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, -ʃi-)

also de•nun•ci•a•tive

(-ˌeɪ tɪv, -ə tɪv)

adj.
characterized by or given to denunciation.
[1720–30]
de•nun′ci•a`tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.denunciatory - containing warning of punishment
inculpative, inculpatory - causing blame to be imputed to

denunciatory

adjective
Containing, relating to, or involving an accusation:
Translations
denunziatorisch
References in classic literature ?
Certainly neither I nor Fernand," said Danglars, rising and looking at the young man, who still remained seated, but whose eye was fixed on the denunciatory sheet of paper flung into the corner.
He was steadying himself on my shoulder with a strong grip, while his other arm, flung up rigidly, pointed a denunciatory finger at the immense tranquillity of the ocean.
Hale's rejoinder, when I had read the item aloud; but the incident evidently weighed upon his mind, for late in the afternoon, with many epithets denunciatory of his foolishness, he asked me to acquaint the police with the affair.
He had made up his mind to see her advance with a measured step and a demure solemnity of countenance; he had felt sure that her face would be mantled with the smile of conscious saintship, or else charged with denunciatory bitterness.
'The Bard' is the imagined denunciatory utterance of a Welsh bard, the sole survivor from the slaughter of the bards made by Edward I of England on his conquest of Wales.
"It ends here--on this very spot." He pressed a denunciatory finger to his breast with force, and became perfectly still.
Meanwhile, hunting professionals in the Marrakech area have demanded that the authorized tourism agency be severely punished for "this disgrace."The series of denunciatory statements and calls for punishment all came with the hope that making an example of the tourism agency would be an effective deterrent for other agenciesauthorized or not.
Add in the plundering of Malaysia for rubber, the agricultural produce of former Rhodesia, the expropriation of diamonds from Botswana, the gold we plundered from the Spanish, and there is barely any part of the British empire that cannot be hauled to denunciatory account.
Another such symptom, in my view, is the degeneration of the critical, satirical, denunciatory, social didactic genre of writing (especially in the case of so-called political poetry, which has in essence adopted the position of Lebedev-Kumach).
(39) Its particular attraction appears to be that it can simultaneously--if not uniquely--combine the denunciatory and the mitigating elements of sentencing, "marking the gravity of the offence while simultaneously acknowledging some extenuating circumstances." (40)
Alienated from the peasants and working class on the one hand, and not being able to be a real part of the imperialist, he became "more and more critical, cynical, disillusioned, bitter and denunciatory in tone" (Ngugi, Decolonising 21).
In official realms, such as courts of law and churches, the term can be entirely denunciatory. This happens for example when the narrative involves someone cashing in on the unfounded spiritual authority of a fake pastor.