deontology

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Related to deontologists: consequentialists

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē′ŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. de·on·tol·o·gies
1. Ethical or moral theory concerned with duties and rights.
2. The doctrine that ethical status of an action lies in its adherence to a set of rules.

[Greek deon, deont-, obligation, necessity (from neuter present participle of dein, to need, lack; see deu-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

de·on′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
de·on′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
de′on·tol′o·gist n.

deontology

(ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Philosophy) the branch of ethics dealing with duty, moral obligation, and moral commitment
[C19: from Greek deon duty (see deontic) + -logy]
ˌdeonˈtologist n

de•on•tol•o•gy

(ˌdi ɒnˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
ethics dealing esp. with duty, moral obligation, and right action.
[1820–30; < Greek deont- that which is binding (s. of déon, neuter present participle of deîn to bind) + -o- + -logy]
de`on•to•log′i•cal (-tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
de`on•tol′o•gist, n.

deontology

the branch of philosophy concerned with ethics, especially that branch dealing with duty, moral obligation, and right action. — deontologist, n. — deontological, adj.
See also: Ethics

deontology

The branch of ethics that deals with moral responsibility.
Translations

deontology

[ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ndeontología f

deontology

nPflichtethik f, → Deontologie f
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, due to the different types of stem cells and their various differentiation potentials, medical deontologists and jurists have not yet reached a consensus on the ways and methods to be used when making use of these cells, causing gaps in the practice.
As decades of work from deontologists have made clear, many people have the intuition that actively bringing about some outcome can often be morally worse than passively allowing that same outcome to occur.
The trouble is, deontologists have a hard time explaining why enriching the poor and healing the sick matter at all.
Deontologists "base their decision making on universal principles and values that transcend time or cultural perspectives" (Gregory, 2009, p.
White (2012) explains that deontologists believe that morality is a matter of duty.
(28) According to deontologists, the main criteria to
Deontologists consider the humanity of the perpetrator, and his free will, to be the very reason why he may be punished, and therefore consider rationales that subject the free will to the good of others to be anathema to criminal punishment.
287, 293 (2011) ("[T]he fundamental dispute of whether principles must dominate, or are dominated by, consequences continues to fume among professed deontologists, avowed consequentialists and those who espouse hybrid approaches.").
Sheeran alludes to the fact that 'While deontologists are content with focusing on laws and rules as the principal guidance for public administrators on morality, even they recognize that laws and regulations are insufficient.
The researchers turned to the deontologists to attest to the integrity of the research; medical deontology and the ethics of research on human beings were still not yet clearly distinguished, though the Norplant controversy would contribute precisely to changing this situation.
Many deontologists explain the epistemic value of justification in terms of its instrumental role in promoting truth--the original source of value in the epistemic domain.
Since the Romantics are teleologists more than they are deontologists, a transformed utilitarianism has its appeal.