deontology


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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē′ŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. de·on·tol·o·gies
1. Ethical or moral theory concerned with duties and rights.
2. The doctrine that ethical status of an action lies in its adherence to a set of rules.

[Greek deon, deont-, obligation, necessity (from neuter present participle of dein, to need, lack; see deu-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

de·on′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
de·on′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
de′on·tol′o·gist n.

deontology

(ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Philosophy) the branch of ethics dealing with duty, moral obligation, and moral commitment
[C19: from Greek deon duty (see deontic) + -logy]
ˌdeonˈtologist n

de•on•tol•o•gy

(ˌdi ɒnˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
ethics dealing esp. with duty, moral obligation, and right action.
[1820–30; < Greek deont- that which is binding (s. of déon, neuter present participle of deîn to bind) + -o- + -logy]
de`on•to•log′i•cal (-tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
de`on•tol′o•gist, n.

deontology

the branch of philosophy concerned with ethics, especially that branch dealing with duty, moral obligation, and right action. — deontologist, n. — deontological, adj.
See also: Ethics

deontology

The branch of ethics that deals with moral responsibility.
Translations

deontology

[ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ndeontología f

deontology

nPflichtethik f, → Deontologie f
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References in periodicals archive ?
He was a practioning physician, malaria combater, researcher, lecturer, manager, man of culture and volunteer work, a retired member of teaching staff of department of History of Medicine and Deontology of Faculty of Medicine of Trakya University in Edirne, Turkey (Figure 1).
Capitalism, Alienation and Critique: Studies in Economy and Dialectics (Dialectics, Deontology and Democracy, Vol.
More specifically, in the sense defined by Wight (2015), the sort of Kantian reasoning found in TJ is characterized as duty-based deontology. The distinguishing features of this sort of ethical compass are: (a) the notion that actions are charged as right or moral for their own features and not for assuring good foreseeable outcomes; and (b) the demandingness to do the right action regardless of its results (White, 2009a; Wight, 2015).
I should also school you a little bit on the deontology of critique and civic engagement.
The same outlook is characteristic of the moral philosophy that goes by the name of "deontology," "expressivist," and "virtue ethics."
And ratcheting up the examples only makes things worse for deontology. Suppose a scientist develops a cure for cancer but keeps it locked up because he's an evil misanthrope.
He also stressed the importance of educating judges and prosecutors on ethics and deontology, as well as on communicating with the media in order to better resist destabilization and disinformation attempts with regard to investigations.
A dimension that is rather poorly analyzed when studying the relationship between the accounting profession and corruption is the human one, namely the ethics and deontology of the professional accountant.
Recently, Tom Dougherty has challenged this orthodoxy by arguing that agent-neutral deontology is possible.
This strategy is articulated around several axes, in particular the consecration of the independence of Justice, the definition of the criteria of the deontology of the judicial and penitentiary professions and the improvement of the quality of the services provided to the litigants.
In chapter one she criticizes the normative paradigms of utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics as being "'high altitude' in that they invoke a higher authority than the subject ..." (2).