dependency

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Related to dependencies: Functional dependencies

de·pen·den·cy

also de·pen·dan·cy (dĭ-pĕn′dən-sē)
n. pl. de·pen·den·cies also de·pen·dan·cies
1. Dependence.
2. Something dependent or subordinate.
3. A minor territory under the jurisdiction of a government.

dependency

(dɪˈpɛndənsɪ) or

dependancy

n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a territory subject to a state on which it does not border
2. (Sociology) a dependent or subordinate person or thing
3. (Psychology) psychol overreliance by a person on another person or on a drug, etc
4. another word for dependence

de•pend•en•cy

(dɪˈpɛn dən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the state of being dependent; dependence.
2. something dependent or subordinate; appurtenance.
3. a subject territory that is not an integral part of the ruling country.
4. outbuilding; annex.
Sometimes, de•pend′an•cy.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dependency - the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something elsedependency - the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
helplessness - the state of needing help from something
reliance - the state of relying on something
subordination - the state of being subordinate to something
contingency - the state of being contingent on something
2.dependency - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)dependency - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)
narcotic - a drug that produces numbness or stupor; often taken for pleasure or to reduce pain; extensive use can lead to addiction
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
drug addiction, white plague - an addiction to a drug (especially a narcotic drug)
3.dependency - a geographical area politically controlled by a distant country
Crown Colony - a British colony controlled by the British Crown, represented by a governor

dependency

noun
1. province, colony, outpost, dominion, protectorate a tiny European dependency
2. overreliance, need for, attachment, reliance, leaning on, clinging on I am concerned by his dependency on his mother.
3. addiction, dependence, craving, need, habit, obsession, enslavement, overreliance He began to show signs of alcohol and drug dependency.

dependency

also dependancy
noun
An area subject to rule by an outside power:
Translations
alusmaariippuvuus
afhankelijkheidafhankelijkskolonieschutgebied

dependency

[dɪˈpendənsɪ] N
1. (Pol) (= territory) → posesión f, dominio m
2. (= dependence) → dependencia f
dependency culturecultura f de dependencia

dependency

[dɪˈpɛndənsi] n
(= country controlled by another) → colonie f
(= reliance) → dépendance f
dependency on sb → dépendance à l'égard de qn
dependency on sth → dépendance à l'égard de qch
(= addiction) (mainly US)dépendance f
drug dependency → dépendance à la drogue f

dependency

n
(= country)Schutzgebiet nt, → Kolonie f

dependency

[dɪˈpɛndənsɪ] n (country) → possedimento

dependency

n dependencia; chemical — drogodependencia, dependencia a sustancias
References in classic literature ?
As for the thoughts of many other objects external to me, as of the sky, the earth, light, heat, and a thousand more, I was less at a loss to know whence these came; for since I remarked in them nothing which seemed to render them superior to myself, I could believe that, if these were true, they were dependencies on my own nature, in so far as it possessed a certain perfection, and, if they were false, that I held them from nothing, that is to say, that they were in me because of a certain imperfection of my nature.
Leaving behind them the broad staircase which leads from the lobby outside the managers' offices to the stage and its dependencies, they crossed the stage, went out by the subscribers' door and entered the house through the first little passage on the left.
He furthermore proposed, that they should give up to M'Tavish, for a proper consideration, the post on the Spokan, and all its dependencies, as they had not sufficient goods on hand to supply that post themselves, and to keep up a competition with the Northwest Company in the trade with the neighboring Indians.
The autocrat of the North Atlantic was still oppressing his kingdom and its outlying dependencies, even as far as the Bay of Biscay, in the dismal secrecy of thick, very thick, weather.
John Jacob Astor to establish an American emporium for the fur trade at the mouth of the Columbia, or Oregon River; of the failure of that enterprise through the capture of Astoria by the British, in 1814; and of the way in which the control of the trade of the Columbia and its dependencies fell into the hands of the Northwest Company.
Hitherto there had been but one opinion of Captain Wentworth among the Musgroves and their dependencies.
There is no shadow of stability in the policy of an English Government, and the most sacred oaths of England would, even if engrossed on vellum, find very few buyers among colonies and dependencies that have suffered from vain beliefs.
A swift messenger had the night before sped round to the outlying dependencies of the Abbey, and had left the summons for every monk to be back in the cloisters by the third hour after noontide.
Nevertheless, in the midst of these pools of water, covered with long grass, rushes, and reeds, were seen solid spots of ground, formerly used as the kitchen-garden, the park, the pleasure-gardens, and other dependencies of the abbey, looking like one of those great sea-spiders, whose body is round, whilst the claws go diverging round from this circumference.
Struck by the scrupulous cleanliness of the courtyard and its dependencies, a stranger would at once have divined that the place belonged to an old maid.
In the census of 1832, there were in Chiloe and its dependencies forty-two thousand souls; the greater number of these appear to be of mixed blood.
The biological question is whether the ability to process dependencies evolved in human cognition along with human language, or is rather a more general skill, also present in other animal species who lack language.