dependent clause


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dependent clause

A dependent clause (also called a subordinate clause) is a clause that relies on the information from an independent clause to form a complete, logical thought. As such, it cannot stand on its own to form a sentence.
There are three types of dependent clause: noun clauses, relative clauses (also called adjective clauses), and adverbial clauses.
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dependent clause

n.
A clause that cannot stand alone as a full sentence and functions as a noun, adjective, or adverb within a sentence. Also called subordinate clause.

dependent clause

n
(Grammar) grammar another term for subordinate clause
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dependent clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
restrictive clause - a subordinate clause that limits or restricts the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
descriptive clause, nonrestrictive clause - a subordinate clause that does not limit or restrict the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The notes, in numbered sections that divide the volume, are not aphorisms but apercus, usually consisting of only a word and a dependent clause, not whole sentences.
According to the "rationalist geometrical mode" of argument found in Descartes and Spinoza," for example, each dependent clause of this type, the "protasis," refers to an established knowledge that logically necessitates an independent clause stating a new knowledge, the "apodosis.
The statement "I walk home from school" can be either true or false and is thus a proposition that can stand alone, but "When I walk home from school," a dependent clause, or "Walking home from school," a phrase, cannot be judged as to truth or falsity.
The sentence fragment Although the pork was a bit tough is a subordinate or dependent clause.
Subordinate clause--Also called a dependent clause, a subordinate clause cannot stand on its own as a sentence.
Some of the formally dependent clause types, in particular the Subordinative and the Participial, often appear in separate sentences on their own (Mithun 2008).
A complex sentence consists of at least one independent clause and one dependent clause.
What is reported in indirect speech is either a main or a dependent clause, or more generally a coordination or a subordination; for instance, She said that she lived alone; She lived alone, she said (Huddleston--Pullum 2002: 1024, 1026-1027).
As for complex clauses, Nuosu reveals a consistent constraint in coordinate and relative clauses for the deletion of the 2nd coreferential NP: each time the 2nd coreferential NP appears in INITIAL position of the linked clause or dependent clause, it has to be deleted.
Silence spits us out and engulfs us again, one and all, and all the noisemakers on Bourbon Street, all the clattering figurines in Cuernavaca can't undo the unpleasant fact that el dia, properly understood, always ends in la muerte, that quiet, like a pair of great parentheses around a dependent clause, closes off our days.
Problems: Backing in to the lead with a dependent clause instead of starting with a subject fuzzes up the message.
relative clause--a type of dependent clause containing a relative pronoun that connects or "relates" to a noun or pronoun in an earlier part of the sentence