dependent clause


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dependent clause

A dependent clause (also called a subordinate clause) is a clause that relies on the information from an independent clause to form a complete, logical thought. As such, it cannot stand on its own to form a sentence.
There are three types of dependent clause: noun clauses, relative clauses (also called adjective clauses), and adverbial clauses.
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dependent clause

n.
A clause that cannot stand alone as a full sentence and functions as a noun, adjective, or adverb within a sentence. Also called subordinate clause.

dependent clause

n
(Grammar) grammar another term for subordinate clause
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dependent clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
restrictive clause - a subordinate clause that limits or restricts the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
descriptive clause, nonrestrictive clause - a subordinate clause that does not limit or restrict the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The technique also works when the introductory matter is a long dependent clause. Here's Gordon's example: "When it became apparent that they were just pulling our legs, we started kicking."
The major difference between the complex sentence and the compound sentence is that whereas the compound sentence combines at least two independent clauses, the complex sentence combines one independent clause with at least one dependent clause. The compound complex sentence, of course, has features of the complex and the compound sentences whose structure has at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause (Quirk et al.
It seems you can't turn on the radio or TV, or peruse the web or print without bumping into this constant dependent clause. If the allegations are true, we have trouble in Washington.
Instead, it may be a process occurring in stages beginning with the absence of any form of reformulation and progressing to reformulation of a relative clause with another language structure, such as another type of dependent clause or simply an adjective, and finally reaching the stage of reformulation with a relative clause.
This sentence is half the length (13 words) and, while the longer one was still a "simple" sentence, this one is "complex" because it contains a dependent clause, that is, a "sentence" that can't stand alone.
Among his topics are the Aktionsart view of Greek prohibitions, the successes of a verbal aspect view, prohibitions using negated dependent clause constructions, warning and promises as prohibitions, and other negative expressions as prohibitions.
But later, when Matthew copies Mark's account, he adds John's famous disclaimer, "I need to be baptized by you, and yet you are coming to me?" The next evangelist, Luke, only refers to Jesus' baptism in a dependent clause: "After all the people had been baptized and Jesus also had been baptized and was praying." John, the last Gospel writer, never mentions the event.
Some of the formally dependent clause types, in particular the Subordinative and the Participial, often appear in separate sentences on their own (Mithun 2008).
Alternatively, maybe the original formulation was closer to: Where a dependent clause is followed by a coordinator and a clause that could be either dependent or independent, a comma before the coordinator signals that the second clause is independent.
The Evolution of Dependent Clause Morpho-syntax in Biblical Hebrew.
* Complex sentence: two clauses, one dependent clause which cannot make sense on its own and one independent clause which can make sense alone.

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