depersonalization


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Related to depersonalization: depersonalization disorder

de·per·son·al·ize

 (dē-pûr′sə-nə-līz′)
tr.v. de·per·son·al·ized, de·per·son·al·iz·ing, de·per·son·al·iz·es
1. To deprive of individual character or a sense of personal identity: a large corporation that depersonalizes its employees.
2. To render impersonal: depersonalize an interview.

de·per′son·al·i·za′tion (-sə-nə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.

depersonalization

(dɪˌpɜːsnəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

depersonalisation

n
1. the act or an instance of depersonalizing
2. (Psychiatry) psychiatry an abnormal state of consciousness in which the subject feels unreal and detached from himself and the world

depersonalization

Pathological loss of contact with reality.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.depersonalization - emotional dissociative disorder in which there is loss of contact with your own personal reality accompanied by feelings of unreality and strangeness
dissociative disorder - dissociation so severe that the usually integrated functions of consciousness and perception of self break down
2.depersonalization - (existentialism) a loss of personal identity; a feeling of being an anonymous cog in an impersonal social machine
existential philosophy, existentialism, existentialist philosophy - (philosophy) a 20th-century philosophical movement chiefly in Europe; assumes that people are entirely free and thus responsible for what they make of themselves
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"
3.depersonalization - representing a human being as a physical thing deprived of personal qualities or individuality; "according to Marx, treating labor as a commodity exemplified the reification of the individual"
objectification - the act of representing an abstraction as a physical thing
Translations

depersonalization

[dɪˌpɜːsnlaɪˈzeɪʃn] n (frm) → spersonalizzazione f

depersonalization

n (psych) despersonalización f
References in periodicals archive ?
This syndrome has a multidimensional conception characterized by emotional exhaustion (EE), reduced personal accomplishment (PA) at work and depersonalization of the other (3,4).
The 20-year-old said he began experiencing insomnia, panic attacks and even depersonalization.
In addition, teacher stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization had indirect effects on IEP outcomes through teaching quality and student engagement.
This 22-article inventory is evaluated in three subdimensions including emotional burnout (EB), depersonalization (D), and personal accomplishment (PA).
It leads to emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment.
Accordingly, previous studies have reported that emergency nurses are more likely to experience burnout due to emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and job-related stress because they face more challenging and life-threatening situations than nurses working in other services (1,9, 11,12).
Burnout syndrome is the result of chronic emotional stress experienced by employees; it is characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and low levels of personal accomplishment [1].
CCHR was at the festival distributing information about the common and well-documented side effects of psychiatric drugs, which include mania, psychosis, hallucinations, depersonalization, suicidal ideation, heart attack, stroke and sudden death.
The most common definition provided for job burnout has been offered by Maslach and Jackson who recognized it as a psychological syndrome comprised of the three dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishments [6, 7].
Burnout has been defined as a syndrome which includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and a perceived reduction in personal accomplishment.
Eastern European scholars of theology, philosophy, and other disciplines discuss anthropological, philosophical, and conceptual foundations of genocide and suicide, including their relationship to the depersonalization of humans and society and the development of science and technology.