deportable


Also found in: Thesaurus.

de·port·a·ble

 (dĭ-pôr′tə-bəl)
adj.
1. Subject to deportation: a deportable alien.
2. Punishable by deportation: a deportable offense.
References in periodicals archive ?
E.g., a summary court-martial conviction for wrongful use of controlled substance may trigger the deportable ground of being a "drug abuser or addict" without having a criminal conviction.
Says immigration lawyer Rachel Van Wormer, "You put the wrong things on your form, and you could be deportable."
While not all deported or deportable immigrant sex offenders are undocumented, the social perceptions of and dynamics concerning undocumented migrants provides an important social context that impacts how society deals with this population.
It also authorized the police to check the immigration status of anyone lawfully stopped and make arrests for potentially deportable offenses.
U.S., when it struck down much of the state's controversial immigration law, including provisions that would have required legal immigrants to carry registration documents, prevented illegal immigrants from seeking or holding employment in the state and given state and local police the power to arrest anyone who they suspected of committing a deportable offense.
Following their convictions, the Immigration and Naturalization Service charged the Kawashimas with being deportable from the United States as aliens who had been convicted under the Immigration and Nationality Act of an aggravated felony (8 U.S.C.
Misdemeanors are redefined for immigrants as "aggravated felonies" so that minor offenses committed by immigrants who may be permanent residents or undocumented are treated as deportable offenses.
CONSIDER THIS FACT: in 2009, more than 25 percent of federal prisoners and a large number of state prisoners were noncitizens and have been convicted of the kinds of crimes that render them immediately deportable once their convictions are final and affirmed on appeal.
Judge Susan Bolton of Federal District Court struck down parts of the Arizona law, enacted last year, that requires police officers to check the immigration status of anyone they have ''reasonable suspicion'' of being in the state illegally, makes it a state crime to be unlawfully present in this country and a state crime for illegal immigrants to work or look for work, and permits the warrantless arrest of anyone believed to be deportable.
children, can become deportable based on a single misdemeanor
The act would provide conditional permanent residency to certain illegal and deportable students who graduate from U.S.
Jose Padilla, the petitioner in Padilla, pied guilty to "transportation of a large amount of marijuana in his tractor-trader." (50) This offense, the majority explains, "is a deportable offense under [INA [section] 237(a)(2)(B)(i)]," (51) the INA provision that renders deportable any non-citizen convicted of a violation of a state, federal, or foreign country's controlled substance law or regulation.