deposition

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Related to depositions: interrogatories

deposition

removal from an office or position; the process of depositing: deposition of the documents with the Library of Congress; the giving of testimony under oath; a statement to be used in court in place of the spoken testimony of the witness
Not to be confused with:
disposition – natural mental and emotional outlook or mood; characteristic attitude: has a mean disposition; an inclination: a gambling disposition; the final settlement of a matter
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

dep·o·si·tion

 (dĕp′ə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of deposing, as from high office.
2. The act of depositing, especially the laying down of matter by a natural process.
3. Something deposited; a deposit.
4. Law Sworn testimony recorded for use in court at a later date.
5. Deposition The removal of Jesus from the cross.

dep′o·si′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deposition

(ˌdɛpəˈzɪʃən; ˌdiːpə-)
n
1. (Law) law
a. the giving of testimony on oath
b. the testimony so given
c. the sworn statement of a witness used in court in his or her absence
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the act or instance of deposing
3. the act or an instance of depositing
4. (Law) something that is deposited; deposit
[C14: from Late Latin dēpositiō a laying down, disposal, burying, testimony]

Deposition

(ˌdɛpəˈzɪʃən; ˌdiːpə-)
n
1. (Bible) the taking down of Christ's body from the Cross or a representation of this
2. (Art Terms) the taking down of Christ's body from the Cross or a representation of this
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dep•o•si•tion

(ˌdɛp əˈzɪʃ ən, ˌdi pə-)

n.
1. removal from an office or position.
2. the act or process of depositing.
3. the state of being deposited.
4. something that is deposited.
5. a statement under oath, taken down in writing, to be used in court.
6. (cap.) a work of art depicting Christ being lowered from the Cross.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin, Latin dēpositiō depositing, burial, derivative of dēpōnere (see depone)]
dep`o•si′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

deposition

An examination of a witness before a trial.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deposition - the natural process of laying down a deposit of something
accretion, accumulation - an increase by natural growth or addition
electrodeposition - the deposition of a substance on an electrode by the action of electricity (especially by electrolysis)
pigmentation - the deposition of pigment in animals or plants or human beings
redeposition - deposition from one deposit to another
superposition - (geology) the deposition of one geological stratum on another
2.deposition - (law) a pretrial interrogation of a witness; usually conducted in a lawyer's office
interrogatory, examination, interrogation - formal systematic questioning
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.deposition - the act of putting something somewhere
buildup - the act of building up an accumulation; "I envied his rapid buildup of assets"; "a military buildup in preparation for the invasion"
repositing, reposition, warehousing, storage - depositing in a warehouse; "they decided to reposition their furniture in a recommended repository in Brooklyn"; "my car is in storage"; "publishers reduced print runs to cut down the cost of warehousing"
4.deposition - the act of deposing someone; removing a powerful person from a position or office
ousting, ouster - the act of ejecting someone or forcing them out
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

deposition

noun
1. sworn statement (Law) evidence, testimony, declaration, affidavit The material would be checked against depositions from other witnesses.
2. depositing, build-up, accumulation, settling, precipitation (technical) This leads to calcium deposition in the blood vessels.
3. removal, dismissal, ousting, toppling, expulsion, displacement, unseating, dethronement It was this issue which led to the deposition of the leader.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

deposition

noun
Law. A formal declaration of truth or fact given under oath:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
elmozdításlerakódásletételleülepedéstanúskodás

deposition

[ˌdiːpəˈzɪʃən] N
1. [of ruler] → deposición f, destitución f
2. (Jur) → declaración f, deposición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deposition

[ˌdɛpəˈzɪʃən ˌdiːpəˈzɪʃən] n
(= formal written statement) → déposition f
(= removal) [leader] → destitution f
deposition of → destitution de
[rock, chemical] → dépôt m
deposition of → dépôt m de
calcium deposition → dépôt m de calcium
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deposition

n
(of sovereign)Entthronung f, → Absetzung f; (of official)Absetzung f
(Jur) → Aussage funter Eid
(Art, Rel) deposition from the crossKreuzabnahme f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deposition

[ˌdiːpəˈzɪʃn] n (Geol, Law) (also, of monarch) → deposizione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A protocol of the violence practiced by the prisoner against his jailer was immediately drawn up, and as it was made on the depositions of Gryphus, it certainly could not be said to be too tame; the prisoner being charged with neither more nor less than with an attempt to murder, for a long time premeditated, with open rebellion.
" A matter of depositions," the Inspector exclaimed.
These facts cannot be called in question, for I myself raised the point during the depositions taken before the committee of artillery."
Faure took down the daroga's depositions and proceeded to treat him as a madman.
There were only a couple of women in the dock, who were nodding to their admiring friends, while the clerk read some depositions to a couple of policemen and a man in plain clothes who leant over the table.
I wish I could doubt the evidence of my senses, but their depositions are unimpeachable.
"That's all very well," said the Inspector, when he had taken Abdul's dramatically dying depositions on the steamer, "but you can't hammer a native merely because he laughs at you.
On the absence of intermediate varieties at the present day -- On the nature of extinct intermediate varieties; on their number -- On the vast lapse of time, as inferred from the rate of deposition and of denudation -- On the poorness of our palaeontological collections -- On the intermittence of geological formations -- On the absence of intermediate varieties in any one formation -- On the sudden appearance of groups of species -- On their sudden appearance in the lowest known fossiliferous strata.
"Yes, yes, the mortuary deposition. You understand, Dantes' relations, if he had any, might have some interest in knowing if he were dead or alive."
Everyone believed the victory to have been complete, and some even spoke of Napoleon's having been captured, of his deposition, and of the choice of a new ruler for France.
"I will recall to these gentlemen, that in the deposition taken at his bedside, the assassinated officer, while declaring that he had a vague idea when the black man accosted him that the latter might be the surly monk, added that the phantom had pressed him eagerly to go and make acquaintance with the accused; and upon his, the captain's, remarking that he had no money, he had given him the crown which the said officer paid to la Falourdel.
For example, there may be a deposition of dew upon the silk, to the extent, even, of several hundred pounds ; ballast has then to be thrown out, or the machine may descend.