depositor


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Related to depositor: depository

de·pos·it

 (dĭ-pŏz′ĭt)
v. de·pos·it·ed, de·pos·it·ing, de·pos·its
v.tr.
1. To put or set down; place.
2. To lay down or leave behind by a natural process: layers of sediment that were deposited on the ocean floor; glaciers that deposited their debris as they melted.
3.
a. To give over or entrust for safekeeping.
b. To put (money) in a bank or financial account.
4. To give as partial payment or security.
v.intr.
To become deposited; settle.
n.
1. Something, such as money, that is entrusted for safekeeping, as in a bank.
2. The condition of being deposited: funds on deposit with a broker.
3. A partial or initial payment of a cost or debt: left a $100 deposit toward the purchase of a stereo system.
4. A sum of money given as security for an item acquired for temporary use.
5. A depository.
6. Something deposited, especially by a natural process, as:
a. Geology A concentration of mineral matter or sediment in a layer, vein, or pocket: iron ore deposits; rich deposits of oil and natural gas.
b. Physiology An accumulation of organic or inorganic material, such as a lipid or mineral, in a body tissue, structure, or fluid.
c. A sediment or precipitate that has settled out of a solution.
7. A coating or crust left on a surface, as by evaporation or electrolysis.

[Latin dēpōnere, dēposit-; see depone.]

de·pos′i·tor n.

depositor

(dɪˈpɒzɪtə)
n
(Banking & Finance) a person who places or has money on deposit in a bank or similar organization

de•pos•i•tor

(dɪˈpɒz ɪ tər)

n.
a person or thing that deposits, esp. a person who deposits money in a bank.
[1555–65; < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.depositor - a person who has deposited money in a bank or similar institution
investor - someone who commits capital in order to gain financial returns
withdrawer - a depositor who withdraws funds previously deposited
Translations

depositor

[dɪˈpɒzɪtəʳ] N (Fin) → depositante mf, impositor(a) m/f

depositor

[dɪˈpɒzɪtər] n (into bank account)déposant(e) m/f

depositor

nDeponent(in) m(f), → Einzahler(in) m(f)

depositor

[dɪˈpɒzɪtəʳ] ndepositante m/f
References in classic literature ?
The Registrar laughed, the barristers laughed, the reporters laughed, the serried ranks of the miserable depositors watching anxiously every word, laughed like one man.
What money would be drawn out of Tellson's henceforth, and what would lie there, lost and forgotten; what plate and jewels would tarnish in Tellson's hiding-places, while the depositors rusted in prisons, and when they should have violently perished; how many accounts with Tellson's never to be balanced in this world, must be carried over into the next; no man could have said, that night, any more than Mr.
Beaufort, after all, had not managed to "tide over"; but by setting afloat the rumour that he had done so he had reassured his depositors, and heavy payments had poured into the bank till the previous evening, when disturbing reports again began to predominate.
Weighted this way she made her way to the yards, again in fear, this time to see if she had lost her place; but fortunately about ten per cent of the working people of Packingtown had been depositors in that bank, and it was not convenient to discharge that many at once.
And so the news went from 'phone to 'phone, until by Monday morning all bankers and chief depositors were aware of the situation, and prepared for the team-play that prevented any general disaster.
That they do not very often want the means, may be gathered from the fact, that in July, 1841, no fewer than nine hundred and seventy-eight of these girls were depositors in the Lowell Savings Bank: the amount of whose joint savings was estimated at one hundred thousand dollars, or twenty thousand English pounds.
It is, of course, well known to you that in a successful banking business as much depends upon our being able to find remunerative investments for our funds as upon our increasing our connection and the number of our depositors.
The latest Economic Brief from the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond suggests that bank runs could be prevented by creating deposit contracts that would eliminate depositor fears that a bank might run out of reserves.
The relationship between a bank and the depositor is governed by contract and such contract may stipulate on the payment of interest.
The bill also proposes permitting depositor to close a PPF account before five years in exigencies.
Certain misgivings have been expressed in the media, especially social media, regarding the depositor protection in the context of "bail-in" provisions of the FRDI Bill.
A depositor of GSIS Family Savings Bank, Villanueva had a balance of P2.