depots


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depots

railroad or bus stations; terminals; storehouses
Not to be confused with:
depose – to remove from office or position: It took a revolution to depose the king.; to give sworn testimony in writing: to depose that it was true
References in classic literature ?
The cities of Germany are absolutely free, they own but little country around them, and they yield obedience to the emperor when it suits them, nor do they fear this or any other power they may have near them, because they are fortified in such a way that every one thinks the taking of them by assault would be tedious and difficult, seeing they have proper ditches and walls, they have sufficient artillery, and they always keep in public depots enough for one year's eating, drinking, and firing.
I had seen two drays hauling the canvas and painted poles up from the depot.
He got his depot to-day, and he isn't sure but he thinks he wants another parkscape and a view on the Hudson.
On the way to the depot he saw nothing of those who saluted him.
You cannot pass into the waiting room of the depot till you have secured your ticket, and you cannot pass from its only exit till the train is at its threshold to receive you.
"Cheer up, Becky!" he said, as he left her at the depot. "You'll find your mother sitting up when you come back, and the next thing you know the whole family'll be moving to some nice little house wherever your work is.
In the evening, there in town, I go to the post office or to the depot to see the train come in, and no one says anything to me.
Skeggs, the keeper of a depot on street, to await the auction, next day.
Hong Kong has beaten Macao in the struggle for the Chinese trade, and now the greater part of the transportation of Chinese goods finds its depot at the former place.
In a word, this favored port combines advantages which not only fit it for a grand naval depot, but almost render it capable of being made the dominant military post of these seas.
A light cart was standing at the door of the 'Great Millinery Depot' of Elveston, laden with card-board packing-cases, which the driver was carrying into the shop, one by one.
They were sons of the local clergy, of the officers at the Depot, and of such manufacturers or men of business as the old town possessed.