deprehend

deprehend

(ˌdɛprɪˈhɛnd)
vb (tr)
archaic to apprehend (a person)
References in periodicals archive ?
In a letter dedicating the volume to Henry, Thynne explains that as "divers imprints" came into his hands, he "easily and without great study might and have deprehended in them many errours, falsities, and depravation." (4) With "cost and pain," he writes, he obtained for his edition "very true" copies of those works of Chaucer's that had already been printed, as well as those that were "never till now imprinted, but [were] remaining almost unknowne, and in oblivion." (5) With additions and some alterations, the 1532 text remained the basis for all printings of Chaucer's Works until the eighteenth century.