depressive

(redirected from depressives)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to depressives: Depressive personality disorder

de·pres·sive

 (dĭ-prĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to depress or lower.
2. Depressing; gloomy: "Americans entertained the depressive thought that they had ceased to be themselves" (Lance Morrow).
3. Of or relating to depression as a mood disorder.
n.
A person who is affected with depression as a mood disorder.

de·pres′sive·ly adv.
de·pres′sive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

depressive

(dɪˈprɛsɪv)
adj
1. (Psychology) tending to depress; causing depression
2. (Psychology) psychol tending to be subject to periods of depression. See also manic-depressive
deˈpressively adv
deˈpressiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•pres•sive

(dɪˈprɛs ɪv)

adj.
1. tending to depress.
2. characterized by mental depression.
n.
3. a person suffering from a depressive illness.
[1610–20]
de•pres′sive•ly, adv.
de•pres′sive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.depressive - someone suffering psychological depression
melancholiac, melancholic - someone subject to melancholia
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

depressive

[dɪˈpresɪv]
A. ADJdepresivo
B. Ndepresivo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

depressive

[dɪˈprɛsɪv] (MEDICINE)
adj [person] → dépressif/ive; [illness] → dépressif/ive
n (= person) → dépressif/ive m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

depressive

adjdepressiv
nan Depressionen Leidende(r) mf; to be a depressivedepressiv sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

depressive

[dɪˈprɛsɪv]
1. adjdepressivo/a
2. n (Psych) → depresso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

de·pres·sive

a. depresivo-a, deprimente;
___ disordertrastorno ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

depressive

adj depresivo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a 7 1/2-year follow-up of formerly hospitalized manic depressives shows that about 40 percent of those receiving lithium, sometimes combined with other treatments, continue to experience marked emotional highs and lows, as well as serious problems at work and home.
Investigators at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass., now report a heightened level of "everyday" creativity -- encompassing vocational and spare-time pursuits -- among people who undergo relatively mild mood swings as well as the healthy relatives of manic depressives. Full-blown manic depressives are less creative than these two groups but show more creativity than control subjects.
These findings are somewhat bleakerthan current figures that have emerged from a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) study involving 1,000 manic depressives at several medical centers, says NIMH psychiattrist Robert M.A.
Sack of the Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland reported that the daily biological rhythms of most winter depressives are delayed and appear to be reset by morning light, which they find to be the best treatment for SAD.
While this personality pattern applies to manic depressives in general, those patients who shifted from an excitable to a melancholic state, or vice versa, within the first eight weeks of the study had the worst prospects for recovery.