depressor

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de·pres·sor

 (dĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
1. Something that depresses or is used to depress.
2. An instrument used to depress a part: a tongue depressor.
3. Any of various muscles that serve to draw down a part of the body.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

depressor

(dɪˈprɛsə)
n
1. a person or thing that depresses
2. (Anatomy) any muscle that draws down a part
3. (Medicine) med an instrument used to press down or aside an organ or part: a tongue depressor.
4. (Physiology) Also called: depressor nerve any nerve that when stimulated produces a fall in blood pressure by dilating the arteries or lowering the heartbeat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•pres•sor

(dɪˈprɛs ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that depresses.
2. a device for pressing down a protruding part: a tongue depressor.
3. any muscle that draws down a part of the body. Compare levator.
4. a nerve that induces a decrease in activity.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.depressor - any skeletal muscle that draws a body part down
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
2.depressor - any nerve whose activity tends to reduce the activity or tone of the body part it serves
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
3.depressor - a device used by physician to press a part down or aside
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
tongue depressor - a thin depressor used to press the tongue down during an examination of the mouth and throat
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

de·pres·sor

n. depresor.
1. agente usado para reducir un nivel establecido de una función o actividad del organismo;
2. tranquilizante que produce depresión.
depressor motormotor del depresor.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Three weeks later, we went back to the vet, the splints came off and bandages with tongue depressors for a little support were put on.
Previously the FDA classified tanning machines as low-risk devices, in the same group as bandages and tongue depressors.
Slated for completion In late 2016, the projects also contracted initial outfitting and transition planning services to ensure the buildings will be ready to serve patients as soon as their doors open, with furniture, fixtures, and equipment in place as well as plenty of tongue depressors and other necessary supplies.
The agency seeks to reclassify the ultraviolet lamps used in tanning beds, upgrading them to class II (moderate risk) from class I (low risk) and to rename them "sunlamps." As class I devices, these lamps are currently deemed to be at the same risk level as adhesive bandages and tongue depressors.
Currently, the FDA classifies tanning sunlamps as class I medical devices 6 a category shared by products like bandages and tongue depressors.
To do this, Davidson carves the rock with toothpicks, tongue depressors, and steel needles.
* 15 paper cups and 15 tongue depressors (NSN 6515-00-324-5500 brings 100 depressors for $1.99) for mixing the compound
At a hearing on medical devices, which range from tongue depressors to artificial hips, Representative Frank Pallone (D-NJ) said he was trying to determine if there were problems that should be fixed through new legislation or increased FDA oversight.
If you saw a man at the Fred Meyer on West 11th Avenue a few days ago buying 100 tongue depressors, it wasn't about some really sick Boy Scout camp.
Mitchell etal attributed some of these infections to the use of wooden tongue depressors as splints at the site of intravenous and arterial cannulation.
Wilkoff's article about how he seldom uses tongue depressors, in great anticipation to see by what skill and wisdom he has achieved this--but nothing!