depth psychology


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depth psychology

n.
1. Psychology of the unconscious mind.
2. Psychoanalysis.

depth psychology

n
(Psychology) psychol the study of unconscious motives and attitudes

depth′ psychol`ogy


n.
any approach to psychology that explains personality in terms of unconscious processes.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.depth psychology - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disordersdepth psychology - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
abreaction, catharsis, katharsis - (psychoanalysis) purging of emotional tensions
psychotherapy - the treatment of mental or emotional problems by psychological means
hypnoanalysis - the use of hypnosis in conjunction with psychoanalysis
anal personality, anal retentive personality - (psychoanalysis) a personality characterized by meticulous neatness and suspicion and reserve; said to be formed in early childhood by fixation during the anal stage of development (usually as a consequence of toilet training)
genital personality - (psychoanalysis) the mature personality which is not dominated by infantile pleasure drives
oral personality - (psychoanalysis) a personality characterized either by generous optimism or aggressive and ambitious selfishness; formed in early childhood by fixation during the oral stage of development
ego - (psychoanalysis) the conscious mind
superego - (psychoanalysis) that part of the unconscious mind that acts as a conscience
id - (psychoanalysis) primitive instincts and energies underlying all psychic activity
introjection - (psychoanalysis) the internalization of the parent figures and their values; leads to the formation of the superego
pleasure principle, pleasure-pain principle, pleasure-unpleasure principle - (psychoanalysis) the governing principle of the id; the principle that an infant seeks gratification and fails to distinguish fantasy from reality
reality principle - (psychoanalysis) the governing principle of the ego; the principle that as a child grows it becomes aware of the real environment and the need to accommodate to it
introject - (psychoanalysis) parental figures (and their values) that you introjected as a child; the voice of conscience is usually a parent's voice internalized
ego ideal - (psychoanalysis) the part of the ego that contains an ideal of personal excellence toward which a person strives
imago - (psychoanalysis) an idealized image of someone (usually a parent) formed in childhood
condensation - (psychoanalysis) an unconscious process whereby two ideas or images combine into a single symbol; especially in dreams
transference - (psychoanalysis) the process whereby emotions are passed on or displaced from one person to another; during psychoanalysis the displacement of feelings toward others (usually the parents) is onto the analyst
latent content - (psychoanalysis) hidden meaning of a fantasy or dream
complex - (psychoanalysis) a combination of emotions and impulses that have been rejected from awareness but still influence a person's behavior
libido - (psychoanalysis) a Freudian term for sexual urge or desire
penis envy - (psychoanalysis) a female's presumed envy of the male's penis; said to explain femininity
death instinct, death wish, Thanatos - (psychoanalysis) an unconscious urge to die
libidinal energy - (psychoanalysis) psychic energy produced by the libido
cathexis, charge - (psychoanalysis) the libidinal energy invested in some idea or person or object; "Freud thought of cathexis as a psychic analog of an electrical charge"
acathexis - (psychoanalysis) a lack of cathexis; a condition in which significant objects or memories arouse no emotion in an individual
psychosexual development - (psychoanalysis) the process during which personality and sexual behavior mature through a series of stages: first oral stage and then anal stage and then phallic stage and then latency stage and finally genital stage
anaclisis - (psychoanalysis) relationship marked by strong dependence on others; especially a libidinal attachment to e.g. a parental figure
castration anxiety - (psychoanalysis) anxiety resulting from real or imagined threats to your sexual functions; originally applied only to men but can in principle apply to women
anal phase, anal stage - (psychoanalysis) the second sexual and social stage of a child's development during which bowel control is learned
genital phase, genital stage - (psychoanalysis) the fifth sexual and social stage in a person's development occurring during adolescence; interest focuses on sexual activity
latency period, latency phase, latency stage - (psychoanalysis) the fourth period (from about age 5 or 6 until puberty) during which sexual interests are supposed to be sublimated into other activities
oral phase, oral stage - (psychoanalysis) the first sexual and social stage of an infant's development; the mouth is the focus of the libido and satisfaction comes from suckling and chewing and biting
phallic phase, phallic stage - (psychoanalysis) the third stage in a child's development when awareness of and manipulation of the genitals is supposed to be a primary source of pleasure
abreact - discharge bad feelings or tension through verbalization
anal retentive, anal - a stage in psychosexual development when the child's interest is concentrated on the anal region; fixation at this stage is said to result in orderliness, meanness, stubbornness, compulsiveness, etc.
oral - a stage in psychosexual development when the child's interest is concentrated in the mouth; fixation at this stage is said to result in dependence, selfishness, and aggression
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Puzzled by this question, I undertook a quest into the depth psychology developed by the Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and researcher Carl Gustav Jung (1875--1961).
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In Jungian-oriented depth psychology, contrary to Patanjali's Yoga psychology, pure consciousness cannot be known.
Nearby, The Seminar, 1988, didactically presented photographs of Flynt and his niece reading, conversing, and posing for the camera; these photos were hung above a vitrine containing excerpts from expository texts on depth psychology by Flynt alongside examples of the mainstream materials he was critiquing.
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The use of psychedelics as cultural drivers and creativity enhancers in the modern era has shaped music, art, literature, and depth psychology.
Pearson is an expert on depth psychology; her life's work has centered on the idea of archetypes and how these mythic, universal patterns affect human behavior.
Her Circle of Trust Recovery Modality marries sacred indigenous teachings of the Shadow, Jungian Depth Psychology Family Constellation Work, and Drama Therapy with modern technologies of physical cleansing and advanced nutrition.
His review of the NT material, the theological essays informed by cultural analysis and depth psychology, and the capstone--a new and renewed practical theology of nonviolence--have become seminal for biblical studies and spirituality.