depth sounder


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depth sounder

n.
An ultrasonic instrument used to measure the depth of water under a ship.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in spite of its small size, it offers many of the amenities of much fancier bass boats including carpeted decks, fore and aft swivel seats, bow-mounted trolling motor, release well, depth sounder and belowdecks storage.
"Our depth sounder read zero and we quickly came to a halt in the sand.
Researchers used data from IceBridge's ice-penetrating radar - the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder, or MCoRDS, which is operated by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan.
One of IceBridge's scientific instruments, the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder, can see through vast layers of ice to measure its thickness and the shape of bedrock below.
She bears a full complement of safety and rescue equipment including a Raymarine radar, a VHF radio, CCTV, a depth sounder, a searchlight, and a loud hailer and is capable of operating both day and night.
Ledford et al., "Multichannel coherent radar depth sounder for NASA operation ice bridge," in Proceedings of the 30th IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS '10), pp.
"Buck" Perry, who spent years studying the dial of his Lowrance Green Box, offered an insightful comment in 1965 that applies to technology today: "The depth sounder can be a great help, provided you can interpret what it shows.
An amphibious Beriev Be-200 aircraft earlier spotted oil spots on the sea surface and the Rubin trailer using an echo depth sounder discovered an object at the depth of 25 meters (82 feet) that could be the missing cargo vessel.
"A two dollar depth sounder is all you need to find bottom," Matera said.
We rewired the boat to use power from the engine to run our essential "boat gear," including a VHF radio, an autopilot system and a depth sounder, along with power for lighting and for a small inverter to run the computer.
To make a new seafloor chart of the area, the team--Gallager, co-principal investigator Vernon Asper of the University of Southern Mississippi, and WHOI engineers Keith vonder Heydt and Gregory Packard--used a portable depth sounder with GPS, deployed over the sides of the boats, and a WHOI-built REMUS autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with sonar.