desacralization


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desacralization

(diːˌsækrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

desacralisation

n
the process of rendering anything less sacred; secularization
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
However avant-garde it may have appeared, such desacralization was actually part of mainstream remembrance, functioning as "a new voice in Israeli Holocaust commemoration" (Zandberg, 2006, p.
"The biggest crime of [scholastic] Christianity, as far as African people are concerned, has been the desacralization of the African spiritual space, that is, of African Life, given the paramount importance of spirituality for African people'" [xxxiii]
At its heart, the student revolt was neither religious nor anti-religious, but it strengthened contemporary tendencies toward desacralization and loss of belief in God.
And the dialectic of the sacred and the profane says that any desacralization is a kind of resacralization, as much as in communication where every decoding is a recoding.
By universalizing the Jewish belief that those exercising legal authority were as subject to Yahweh's law as everyone else, Christianity achieved the hitherto unthinkable: the state's desacralization. Christianity was respectful of the Roman state's authority.
One of the consequences of these changes in the textual domain was, I argue, the desacralization of the cosmos, the leaching away of the powerful emotional charge that less rationalized cultures invest in their world, leaving the desacralized cosmos cold, lifeless, devoid of mystery.
Tano, Mokomokai: Commercialization and Desacralization (International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management, 2004).
Leao and Brant (25) argue that the central issue to supplant this approach is in the "desacralization" of the clinical and epidemiological perspective for the unleashing of Surveillance actions, urging that we must concentrate on efforts for understanding the complexity of the inherent phenomenon of suffering at work for the production of information and practices that are not solely based on the diagnosis and quantification of these phenomenon.
There have been criticisms bemoaning the dumbing-down and desacralization of the Revolution (by Andrew Ferguson in The Weekly Standard and Edward Rothstein in the Wall Street Journal).