descry

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de·scry

 (dĭ-skrī′)
tr.v. de·scried, de·scry·ing, de·scries
1. To catch sight of (something difficult to discern). See Synonyms at see1.
2. To discover by careful observation or scrutiny; detect: descried a message of hope in her words.

[Middle English descrien, from Old French descrier, to call, cry out; see decry.]

de·scri′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

descry

(dɪˈskraɪ)
vb (tr) , -scries, -scrying or -scried
1. to discern or make out; catch sight of
2. to discover by looking carefully; detect
[C14: from Old French descrier to proclaim, decry]
deˈscrier n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•scry

(dɪˈskraɪ)

v.t. -scried, -scry•ing.
1. to see (something unclear) by looking carefully.
2. to discover; detect.
[1250–1300; < Old French de(s)crïer to proclaim, decry. See dis-1, cry]
de•scri′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

descry


Past participle: descried
Gerund: descrying

Imperative
descry
descry
Present
I descry
you descry
he/she/it descries
we descry
you descry
they descry
Preterite
I descried
you descried
he/she/it descried
we descried
you descried
they descried
Present Continuous
I am descrying
you are descrying
he/she/it is descrying
we are descrying
you are descrying
they are descrying
Present Perfect
I have descried
you have descried
he/she/it has descried
we have descried
you have descried
they have descried
Past Continuous
I was descrying
you were descrying
he/she/it was descrying
we were descrying
you were descrying
they were descrying
Past Perfect
I had descried
you had descried
he/she/it had descried
we had descried
you had descried
they had descried
Future
I will descry
you will descry
he/she/it will descry
we will descry
you will descry
they will descry
Future Perfect
I will have descried
you will have descried
he/she/it will have descried
we will have descried
you will have descried
they will have descried
Future Continuous
I will be descrying
you will be descrying
he/she/it will be descrying
we will be descrying
you will be descrying
they will be descrying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been descrying
you have been descrying
he/she/it has been descrying
we have been descrying
you have been descrying
they have been descrying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been descrying
you will have been descrying
he/she/it will have been descrying
we will have been descrying
you will have been descrying
they will have been descrying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been descrying
you had been descrying
he/she/it had been descrying
we had been descrying
you had been descrying
they had been descrying
Conditional
I would descry
you would descry
he/she/it would descry
we would descry
you would descry
they would descry
Past Conditional
I would have descried
you would have descried
he/she/it would have descried
we would have descried
you would have descried
they would have descried
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.descry - catch sight of
sight, spy - catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes; "he caught sight of the king's men coming over the ridge"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

descry

verb catch sight of, see, notice, mark, discover, sight, observe, recognize, distinguish, perceive, detect, make out, discern, behold, espy, spy out From the top of the hill I descried a solitary rider.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

descry

verb
1. To perceive and fix the identity of, especially with difficulty:
2. To perceive, especially barely or fleetingly:
3. To perceive with a special effort of the senses or the mind:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
rozeznat

descry

[dɪsˈkraɪ] VT (liter) → divisar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

descry

vt (form, liter)gewahren (geh), → erblicken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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Small wonder Marty Wiseman, the professor who taught the public policy and administration classes French took in earning his doctorate in public administration, descries French as "a very energetic type."
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And in a little over a year Rose, who descries her style as a cross between '60s model Twiggy and '60s and early '70s Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, converted her studio apartment to My Closet Shoppe (www.myclosetshoppe.com).