descriptivism


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de·scrip·tiv·ism

 (dĭ-skrĭp′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The practice or application of descriptive linguistics, especially in the analysis of grammar.

de·scrip′tiv·ist adj. & n.
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descriptivism

(dɪˈskrɪptɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) ethics the theory that moral utterances have a truth value. Compare prescriptivism, emotivism
deˈscriptiˌvist adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.descriptivism - (ethics) a doctrine holding that moral statements have a truth value
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
2.descriptivism - (linguistics) a doctrine supporting or promoting descriptive linguistics
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
descritivismo

descriptivism

[dɪsˈkrɪptɪvɪzəm] Ndescriptivismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

descriptivism

n (Ling, Philos) → Deskriptivismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, descriptivism favours looking at a language as it 'is' being used rather than how it 'should' be used.
The Golden Age of Philosophy of Science 1945 to 2000: Logical Reconstructionism, Descriptivism, Normative Naturalism, and Foundationalism
62-3 and 107-8) and contrasting Samuelson's descriptivism with Friedman's methodology, it is Wong (1973, p.
This paper argues for a version of metalinguistic descriptivism, the Mill-Frege view, comparing it to a currently popular alternative, predicativism.
In so doing, Krotoszynski indulges neither pure cultural descriptivism nor legal universalism.
EVANS (2011a), << Substracting "ought" from "is": Descriptivism versus normativism in the study of human thinking >>, Behavioral and Brain Science, vol.
But if you want a better handle on why people are so often violent or prone to acting like robots when marching under a flag, Sapolsky's descriptivism provides a sensible explanation for a nonsensical world.
that some endorse descriptivism but reject conceptual analysis as the
Let us begin from why non-naturalists cannot rely on simple versions of descriptivism. According to them, the meaning of the predicate "is P" consists of a set of descriptions that an object must satisfy in order for it to count as P.
When prescriptivism is grounded in utility rather than fact, in the realist sense, it is perfectly consistent with descriptivism, since descriptivism, alternatively, is grounded in fact much more straightforwardly.
Now, even though Kripke introduces his theory of reference in direct confrontation to views such as Russell's or Frege's, it is still possible to think of forms of descriptivism or conceptualism as a useful complement to the Kripkean program, that perhaps in some modified version could help in explaining the cognitive value of certain identity statements attending to the information previous to the discovery of their truth or falsehood.