desertion


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de·ser·tion

 (dĭ-zûr′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of deserting.
b. The state of being deserted.
2. Law
a. Willful abandonment of a spouse or child owed a duty of support.
b. The willful, permanent separation of one spouse from the other without acceptable cause or the other's consent, considered as a ground for divorce.

desertion

(dɪˈzɜːʃən)
n
1. (Military) the act of deserting or abandoning or the state of being deserted or abandoned
2. (Law) law wilful abandonment, esp of one's spouse or children, without consent and in breach of obligations

de•ser•tion

(dɪˈzɜr ʃən)

n.
1. the act of deserting or the state of being deserted.
2. willful abandonment of a spouse, dependent children, etc., in violation of legal or moral obligations.
[1585–95; < Latin dēsertiō=dēser(ere) (see desert1) + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.desertion - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibilitydesertion - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibility; "his abandonment of his wife and children left them penniless"
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
abscondment, decampment - the act of running away secretly (as to avoid arrest)
absence without leave, unauthorized absence - unauthorized military absence
deviationism - ideological defection from the party line (especially from orthodox communism)
2.desertion - the act of giving something updesertion - the act of giving something up  
rejection - the act of rejecting something; "his proposals were met with rejection"
exposure - abandoning without shelter or protection (as by leaving as infant out in the open)
apostasy, tergiversation - the act of abandoning a party for cause
bolt - a sudden abandonment (as from a political party)

desertion

noun
1. abandonment, betrayal, forsaking, dereliction, relinquishment It was a long time since she'd referred to her father's desertion of them.
2. defection, betrayal, reneging, repudiation, apostasy, relinquishment, abjuration mass desertion by the electorate
3. absconding, flight, escape (informal), running away, evasion, defection, truancy, decamping, dereliction, going AWOL, taking French leave The high rate of desertion has added to the army's woes.

desertion

noun
The act of forsaking:
Translations
هَجْر، تَرْك
zběhnutí
deserteringflugt
dezertálás
liîhlaup
dezercia
bırakıp gitmeterk etme

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːʃən] N (Mil) → deserción f; [of spouse] → abandono m

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːrʃən] n
(by soldier)désertion f
(by husband)abandon m
on grounds of desertion (LAW)pour abandon du domicile conjugaldesert island [ˌdɛzərtˈaɪlənd] nîle f déserte

desertion

n
(= act)Verlassen nt; (Jur: of wife, family) → böswilliges Verlassen; (Mil) → Desertion f, → Fahnenflucht f; (fig)Fahnenflucht f; desertion to the enemyÜberlaufen ntzum Feind
(= state)Verlassenheit f

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːʃn] n (Mil) → diserzione f; (of spouse) → abbandono del tetto coniugale

desert1

(diˈzəːt) verb
1. to go away from and leave without help etc; to leave or abandon. Why did you desert us?
2. to run away, usually from the army. He was shot for trying to desert.
deˈserted adjective
1. with no people etc. The streets are completely deserted.
2. abandoned. his deserted wife and children.
deˈserter noun
a man who deserts from the army etc.
deˈsertion (-ʃən) noun
(an) act of deserting.
References in classic literature ?
From that time nothing was heard of but desertion in Lambert's army.
In the following cases: physical defect in the married parties, desertion without communication for five years," he said, crooking a short finger covered with hair, "adultery" (this word he pronounced with obvious satisfaction), "subdivided as follows" (he continued to crook his fat fingers, though the three cases and their subdivisions could obviously not be classified together): "physical defect of the husband or of the wife, adultery of the husband or of the wife.
The fact of Desertion I will not dispute; But its guilt, as I trust, is removed(So far as related to the costs of this suit) By the Alibi which has been proved.
These poor lads have chosen me cap'n, after your desertion, sir"-- laying a particular emphasis upon the word "desertion.
Gardiner then rallied her niece on Wickham's desertion, and complimented her on bearing it so well.
My mother-in-law came to me in tears and said that Helene was here and that she implored me to hear her; that she was innocent and unhappy at my desertion, and much more.
Hunt, partly incited by indignation, partly by the policy of deterring others from desertion, put his threat into execution, and left them to find their way back to the settlements without, as he supposed, a single bullet or charge of powder.
Abruptly the cruelty of this desertion became clear to me.
The curate, who had been crouching silently with his arms over his head, looked up as I passed, cried out quite loudly at my desertion of him, and came running after me.
Whichever way his thoughts turned they were followed by the somber phantom of the desertion in the fields.
During the stay of the troops at the foot of the Otsego a soldier was shot for desertion.
In the morning Jones grew a little uneasy at the desertion of his surgeon, as he apprehended some inconvenience, or even danger, might attend the not dressing his wound; he enquired of the drawer, what other surgeons were to be met with in that neighbourhood.