desired

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de·sire

 (dĭ-zīr′)
tr.v. de·sired, de·sir·ing, de·sires
1. To wish or long for; want: a reporter who desires an interview; a teen who desires to travel.
2. To want to have sex with (another person).
3. To express a wish for; request.
n.
1.
a. The feeling of wanting to have something or wishing that something will happen.
b. An instance of this feeling: She had a lifelong desire to visit China.
2. Sexual appetite; passion.
3. An object of such feeling or passion: A quiet evening with you is my only desire.
4. Archaic A request or petition.

[Middle English desiren, from Old French desirer, from Latin dēsīderāre, to observe or feel the absence of, miss, desire : dē-, de- + -sīderāre (as in cōnsīderāre, to observe attentively, contemplate; see consider).]

de·sir′er n.
Synonyms: desire, covet, crave, want, wish
These verbs mean to have a strong longing for: desire peace; coveted the new car; craving fame and fortune; wanted a drink of water; wished that she had gone to the beach.

desired

(dɪˈzaɪəd)
adj
wished for
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.desired - greatly desired
desirable - worth having or seeking or achieving; "a desirable job"; "computer with many desirable features"; "a desirable outcome"
2.desired - wanted intensely; "the child could no longer resist taking one of the craved cookies"; "it produced the desired effect"
wanted - desired or wished for or sought; "couldn't keep her eyes off the wanted toy"; "a wanted criminal"; "a wanted poster"

desired

adjective
1. intended, wanted, wished for, needed, longed for, coveted, sought-after His warnings have provoked the desired response.
2. required, necessary, correct, appropriate, right, expected, fitting, particular, express, accurate, proper, exact Cut the material to the desired size.
Translations

desired

[dɪˈzaɪərd] adj [result, effect] → désiré(e)
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a great deal of evidence in Flaubert's notes and correspondence that he perceived the nineteenth century as some kind of monolithic beast, as a fearfully autonomous and self-propelled entity in the domain of history, radically disengaged from the rest of time - in all, though monstrous, as a desiredly (and deservedly) representable figure.