desist

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de·sist

 (dĭ-sĭst′, -zĭst′)
intr.v. de·sist·ed, de·sist·ing, de·sists
To cease doing something. See Synonyms at stop.

[Middle English desisten, from Old French desister, from Latin dēsistere : dē-, de- + sistere, to bring to a standstill; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

desist

(dɪˈzɪst)
vb
(often foll by: from) to cease, as from an action; stop or abstain
[C15: from Old French desister, from Latin dēsistere to leave off, stand apart, from de- + sistere to stand, halt]
deˈsistance, deˈsistence n

de•sist

(dɪˈzɪst, -ˈsɪst)

v.i.
to cease, as from some action or proceeding; stop.
[1425–75; < Old French desister < Latin dēsistere to leave off]

desist


Past participle: desisted
Gerund: desisting

Imperative
desist
desist
Present
I desist
you desist
he/she/it desists
we desist
you desist
they desist
Preterite
I desisted
you desisted
he/she/it desisted
we desisted
you desisted
they desisted
Present Continuous
I am desisting
you are desisting
he/she/it is desisting
we are desisting
you are desisting
they are desisting
Present Perfect
I have desisted
you have desisted
he/she/it has desisted
we have desisted
you have desisted
they have desisted
Past Continuous
I was desisting
you were desisting
he/she/it was desisting
we were desisting
you were desisting
they were desisting
Past Perfect
I had desisted
you had desisted
he/she/it had desisted
we had desisted
you had desisted
they had desisted
Future
I will desist
you will desist
he/she/it will desist
we will desist
you will desist
they will desist
Future Perfect
I will have desisted
you will have desisted
he/she/it will have desisted
we will have desisted
you will have desisted
they will have desisted
Future Continuous
I will be desisting
you will be desisting
he/she/it will be desisting
we will be desisting
you will be desisting
they will be desisting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been desisting
you have been desisting
he/she/it has been desisting
we have been desisting
you have been desisting
they have been desisting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been desisting
you will have been desisting
he/she/it will have been desisting
we will have been desisting
you will have been desisting
they will have been desisting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been desisting
you had been desisting
he/she/it had been desisting
we had been desisting
you had been desisting
they had been desisting
Conditional
I would desist
you would desist
he/she/it would desist
we would desist
you would desist
they would desist
Past Conditional
I would have desisted
you would have desisted
he/she/it would have desisted
we would have desisted
you would have desisted
they would have desisted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.desist - choose not to consumedesist - choose not to consume; "I abstain from alcohol"
fast - abstain from eating; "Before the medical exam, you must fast"
fast - abstain from certain foods, as for religious or medical reasons; "Catholics sometimes fast during Lent"
keep off, avoid - refrain from certain foods or beverages; "I keep off drugs"; "During Ramadan, Muslims avoid tobacco during the day"
teetotal - practice teetotalism and abstain from the consumption of alcoholic beverages

desist

verb stop, cease, refrain from, end, kick (informal), give up, suspend, break off, abstain, discontinue, leave off, have done with, give over (informal), forbear, belay (Nautical) Kindly desist from making so much noise.

desist

verb
To cease trying to accomplish or continue:
Informal: swear off.
Slang: lay off.
Translations
elállfelhagy

desist

[dɪˈzɪst] VI to desist from sthdesistir de algo
to desist from doing sthdejar or desistir de hacer algo
we begged him to desistle rogamos que desistiera or que lo dejara

desist

[dɪˈzɪst] vi (= stop) → cesser
to desist from sth → cesser qch
to desist from doing sth → cesser de faire qch

desist

vi (form)Abstand nehmen, absehen (from doing sth davon, etw zu tun, from sth von etw)

desist

[dɪˈzɪst] vi (frm) to desist (from)desistere (da)
References in periodicals archive ?
Corrections agencies need to expand the use of medication-assisted treatment, a proven intervention in community-level care, in support of desistence from drugs.
In most teens, this interaction abates as the adolescent matures, leading to desistence. Part II describes briefly a category of young offenders less likely than normative adolescents to desist from antisocial activity with maturity because their offending is driven by various dispositional and environmental factors--many of which predated adolescence--and not primarily by the interaction of developmental factors and social context.
Since the vast majority of pre-pubertal children with gender dysphoria (80-95%) will revert back to a gender identity consistent with their sex, forced societal cooperation with transgender identification carries the high risk of interfering with eventual desistence. With currently available data, it is not possible to accurately predict those individuals who will desist from those who will persist in transgender identity.
to establish) to the deterrence or desistence of offenders.
(190) Therefore, the legal system should refrain from incarcerating juveniles for long periods of time so as not to disrupt a juvenile's normal aging progression toward desistence. (191) Furthermore, a significant minority of juvenile offenders commit serious crimes at high rates: "Age-crime curves [provide evidence that] peak years of criminal involvement are in the late teens and early 20s.
Interestingly, Middle Eastern countries like Saudi Arabia and Israel criticized the agreement on the grounds that empowering Iran could jeopardize the region's security although besides being alleged with supporting Lebanon's Hezbollah, Iran has not displayed any aggressive policy of hegemony as evident from its desistence from employing chemical weapons during the Iraq-Iran war.
The authors discuss the methodologies of life-course and longitudinal research; the major theories in life-course criminology; risk, prediction, onset, desistence, and persistence of criminal behavior, and other related subjects.
There is a growing research literature which suggests that the progression from persistent offending to desistence is the outcome of a complex interaction between subjective and social factors (Farmer, McAlinden and Maruna, 2015); that is, structure (informal social controls such as relationships with intimate partners and employment) and agency (the way in which offenders think about themselves and their lives).
"Desistence from Sex Work: Feminist Cultural Criminology and Intersectionality: The Complexities of Moving in and out of Sex Work." Pp.
LAW INST., supra note 6, at 324-25 (describing the probable desistence test as "[o]riented largely toward the dangerousness of the actor's conduct").