despicable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

de·spic·a·ble

 (dĭ-spĭk′ə-bəl, dĕs′pĭ-kə-bəl)
adj.
Deserving of contempt or scorn; vile.

[Late Latin dēspicābilis, from Latin dēspicārī, to despise; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

de·spic′a·ble·ness n.
de·spic′a·bly adv.
Usage Note: The original standard pronunciation of despicable had stress on the first syllable. During the 1900s, the placement of stress gradually shifted to the second syllable, and now that pronunciation is the usual one.

despicable

(dɪˈspɪkəbəl; ˈdɛspɪk-)
adj
worthy of being despised; contemptible; mean
[C16: from Late Latin dēspicābilis, from dēspicārī to disdain; compare despise]
deˌspicaˈbility, deˈspicableness n
deˈspicably adv

des•pi•ca•ble

(ˈdɛs pɪ kə bəl, dɪˈspɪk ə-)

adj.
deserving to be despised; contemptible.
[1545–55; < Late Latin dēspicābilis= Latin dēspic(ārī) to despise]
des′pi•ca•ble•ness, n.
des′pi•ca•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.despicable - morally reprehensible; "would do something as despicable as murder"; "ugly crimes"; "the vile development of slavery appalled them"; "a slimy little liar"
evil - morally bad or wrong; "evil purposes"; "an evil influence"; "evil deeds"

despicable

despicable

adjective
Translations
حَقير، خَسيس
opovrženíhodný
foragteligmodbydeligussel
fyrirlitlegur

despicable

[dɪsˈpɪkəbl] ADJvil, despreciable

despicable

[ˈdɛspɪkəbəl dɪˈspɪkəbəl] adjméprisable

despicable

[dɪsˈpɪkəbl] adjspregevole; (behaviour) → vergognoso/a; (person) → ignobile

despise

(diˈspaiz) verb
1. to look upon with scorn and contempt. I know he despises me for failing my exam.
2. to refuse to have, use etc; to scorn. She despises such luxuries as fur boots.
despicable (diˈspikəbl) adjective
contemptible, worthless and deserving to be despised. His behaviour was despicable.
deˈspicably adverb
References in classic literature ?
"You will only injure yourself if you take notice of despicable enemies."
Where attempts have not been made to reconcile the two moralities, they may be described as follows:--All is GOOD in the noble morality which proceeds from strength, power, health, well-constitutedness, happiness, and awfulness; for, the motive force behind the people practising it is "the struggle for power." The antithesis "good and bad" to this first class means the same as "noble" and "despicable." "Bad" in the master-morality must be applied to the coward, to all acts that spring from weakness, to the man with "an eye to the main chance," who would forsake everything in order to live.
It was a peculiar combination of old-maidishness and licentiousness that made Cutter seem so despicable.
In this house the despicable little miser, who lived rent free in London, now lives, rent free again, on the coast of Suffolk.
I wrote it thinking it would sound very witty; but now that I have seen myself that I only wanted to show off in a despicable way--I will not scratch it out on purpose!) When petitioners used to come for information to the table at which I sat, I used to grind my teeth at them, and felt intense enjoyment when I succeeded in making anybody unhappy.
To him the police were always actuated by malignant impulses and the rest of the world was composed, for the most part, of despicable creatures who were all trying to take advantage of him and with whom, in defense, he was obliged to quarrel on all possible occasions.
She has money enough to live very comfortably, if she only knew how to use it judiciously, and had taught her son to do the same; but she is ever straining to keep up appearances, with that despicable pride that shuns the semblance of poverty as of a shameful crime.
His assistant is only little - mean - despicable!" Loud and hurried in its wrath, low and deliberate in its contempt, all this was uttered with a furious and abnormal eloquence, which would have struck me, loving her, to the ground.
There are long passages now before us of the most despicable trash, with no merit whatever beyond that of their antiquity..
He had an unerring eye for the despicable motive in actions that had all the appearance of innocence.
It seems to me mean to spend your time suspecting soldiers who have fought for their king and their country, of such a despicable crime."
Martin told him that his hatred of the magazines was rabid, fanatical, and that his conduct was a thousand times more despicable than that of the youth who burned the temple of Diana at Ephesus.