despise

(redirected from despisers)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to despisers: contemptuousness, contemns, disdains

de·spise

 (dĭ-spīz′)
tr.v. de·spised, de·spis·ing, de·spis·es
1. To regard with contempt or scorn: despised all cowards and flatterers.
2. To dislike intensely; loathe: despised the frigid weather in January.

[Middle English despisen, from Old French despire, despis-, from Latin dēspicere : dē-, de- + specere, to look; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

de·spis′al (-spī′zəl) n.
de·spis′er n.
Synonyms: despise, contemn, disdain, scorn
These verbs mean to regard with utter contempt: despises incompetence; contemned the dictator's actions; disdained my suggestion; scorns sentimentality.
Antonym: esteem
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

despise

(dɪˈspaɪz)
vb
(tr) to look down on with contempt; scorn: he despises flattery.
[C13: from Old French despire, from Latin dēspicere to look down, from de- + specere to look]
deˈspiser n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•spise

(dɪˈspaɪz)

v.t. -spised, -spis•ing.
to regard with contempt or disdain; scorn.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French despis-, s. of despire < Latin dēspicere; see despicable]
de•spis′a•ble, adj.
de•spis′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

despise


Past participle: despised
Gerund: despising

Imperative
despise
despise
Present
I despise
you despise
he/she/it despises
we despise
you despise
they despise
Preterite
I despised
you despised
he/she/it despised
we despised
you despised
they despised
Present Continuous
I am despising
you are despising
he/she/it is despising
we are despising
you are despising
they are despising
Present Perfect
I have despised
you have despised
he/she/it has despised
we have despised
you have despised
they have despised
Past Continuous
I was despising
you were despising
he/she/it was despising
we were despising
you were despising
they were despising
Past Perfect
I had despised
you had despised
he/she/it had despised
we had despised
you had despised
they had despised
Future
I will despise
you will despise
he/she/it will despise
we will despise
you will despise
they will despise
Future Perfect
I will have despised
you will have despised
he/she/it will have despised
we will have despised
you will have despised
they will have despised
Future Continuous
I will be despising
you will be despising
he/she/it will be despising
we will be despising
you will be despising
they will be despising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been despising
you have been despising
he/she/it has been despising
we have been despising
you have been despising
they have been despising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been despising
you will have been despising
he/she/it will have been despising
we will have been despising
you will have been despising
they will have been despising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been despising
you had been despising
he/she/it had been despising
we had been despising
you had been despising
they had been despising
Conditional
I would despise
you would despise
he/she/it would despise
we would despise
you would despise
they would despise
Past Conditional
I would have despised
you would have despised
he/she/it would have despised
we would have despised
you would have despised
they would have despised
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.despise - look down on with disdain; "He despises the people he has to work for"; "The professor scorns the students who don't catch on immediately"
detest, hate - dislike intensely; feel antipathy or aversion towards; "I hate Mexican food"; "She detests politicians"
look down on - regard with contempt; "the new neighbor looks down on us because our house is very modest"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

despise

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

despise

verb
1. To regard with utter contempt and disdain:
2. To regard with extreme dislike and hostility:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَحْتَقِريَحْتَقِرُيَزْدَري، يَسْتَخِف ب
opovrhovatpohrdatpohrdnout
foragte
halveksiahalveksua
prezirati
fyrirlítahafa andstyggî á
軽蔑軽蔑する
경멸하다
niekingainiekingasniekinti
nicinātnievāt
opovrhnúť
prezirati
förakta
เหยียดหยาม
khinh thường

despise

[dɪsˈpaɪz] VTdespreciar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

despise

[dɪˈspaɪz] vt [+ person, thing] → mépriser
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

despise

vtverachten; food alsoverschmähen; to despise oneself (for something)sich selbst (wegen etw) verachten; she despised herself for deceiving himsie verachtete sich selbst dafür, dass sie ihn betrogen hatte
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

despise

[dɪsˈpaɪz] vt (person) → disprezzare, sdegnare; (sb's attentions, offer) → disdegnare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

despise

(diˈspaiz) verb
1. to look upon with scorn and contempt. I know he despises me for failing my exam.
2. to refuse to have, use etc; to scorn. She despises such luxuries as fur boots.
despicable (diˈspikəbl) adjective
contemptible, worthless and deserving to be despised. His behaviour was despicable.
deˈspicably adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

despise

يَحْتَقِرُ opovrhovat foragte verachten περιφρονώ despreciar halveksia mépriser prezirati disprezzare 軽蔑する 경멸하다 verafschuwen forakte wzgardzić desprezar презирать förakta เหยียดหยาม hor görmek khinh thường 鄙视
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Despisers of life are they, decaying ones and poisoned ones themselves, of whom the earth is weary: so away with them!
I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore.
Destroyers, will they be called, and despisers of good and evil.
The good and just hate thee, and call thee their enemy and despiser; the believers in the orthodox belief hate thee, and call thee a danger to the multitude.
The despisers of mankind--apart from the mere fools and mimics, of that creed--are of two sorts.
But his son Antoninus was a most eminent man, and had very excellent qualities, which made him admirable in the sight of the people and acceptable to the soldiers, for he was a warlike man, most enduring of fatigue, a despiser of all delicate food and other luxuries, which caused him to be beloved by the armies.
'Whence hadst thou that song, despiser of this world?'
In this analysis of our current global political conflict, which carries with it, and is perhaps driven by, an overtly religious agenda, Fish echoes a sentiment from two centuries ago, voiced by the one many consider to be the founder of modern religious thought, Friedrich Schleiermacher, in his speeches to the "cultured despisers" of religion.
He accepts Josephus as "an original and developed historiographer, rather than a mechanistic compiler." He was a devout Jew on a mission "to define a particular way of being Jewish in Rome" as well as a writer thrusting an apologetic in the face of cultured despisers of the Jews.
And one can easily turn the tables on religion's cultured despisers: let's explain Bill Clinton's sexual infidelities and looseness with the truth by the degree of his secularization.
He will not classify himself as a conservative, but neither does he admit to being a liberal; he rejects the extreme positions of both abortion supporters and opponents; he perceives a case for countenancing prayer in the schools and a case against it; he declines to embrace the platform of the Christian Coalition but he has little truck with the cultured despisers of traditional religion; divorce, he argues, is occasionally justified but mostly not; the state is too much with us but the rollback advocated by the troops of the Gingrich revolution is too radical.
Even some of the 'cultured despisers' of religion have noticed that the religions are not going to disappear (three to four billion disappearances are hard to imagine) and that millions of intelligent people (even perhaps as intelligent and cultured as themselves) are actually practising members of religious communities and, in many cases, of academic communities too.