despondency


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de·spon·den·cy

 (dĭ-spŏn′dən-sē)
n.
Depression of spirits from loss of hope, confidence, or courage; dejection.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

de•spond•en•cy

(dɪˈspɒn dən si)

also de•spond′ence,



n.
the state of being despondent; depression of spirits from loss of courage or hope; dejection.
[1645–55]
syn: See despair.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.despondency - feeling downcast and disheartened and hopeless
depression - sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

despondency

noun dejection, depression, despair, misery, gloom, sadness, desperation, melancholy, hopelessness, the hump (Brit. informal), discouragement, wretchedness, low spirits, disconsolateness, dispiritedness, downheartedness There's a mood of gloom and despondency in the country.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

despondency

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَأْس، فُتور العَزيمَه
malomyslnostskleslost
fortvivlelsemodløshed
csüggedtség
vonleysi

despondency

[dɪsˈpɒndənsɪ] N despondence [disˈpɒndəns] Nabatimiento m, desaliento m, pesimismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

despondency

[dɪˈspɒndənsi] n (= dejection) → découragement m, abattement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

despondency

[dɪsˈpɒndənsɪ] n (frm) → abbattimento, avvilimento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

despondent

(diˈspondənt) adjective
feeling miserable, unhappy, gloomy etc. She was utterly despondent at her failure.
deˈspondently adverb
deˈspondency noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

despondency

n. desaliento; desesperación.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
She felt she had been childish and unwise the night before in giving herself over to despondency. She recapitulated the motives which no doubt explained Robert's reserve.
MY DEAREST MAKAR ALEXIEVITCH,--Are not you, my friend and benefactor, just a little ashamed to repine and give way to such despondency? And surely you are not offended with me?
Both men had lost hope--Johnson, because of temperamental despondency; Leach, because he had beaten himself out in the vain struggle and was exhausted.
And the despondency of the next morning's dawn, when it was no longer Sunday, but Monday; and no best clothes; and the laughing visitors were gone, and she awoke alone in her old bed, the innocent younger children breathing softly around her.
I was in this despondency when a sudden recollection of Irene and Mrs.
I learned from Werter's imaginations despondency and gloom, but Plutarch taught me high thoughts; he elevated me above the wretched sphere of my own reflections, to admire and love the heroes of past ages.
This state between reviving hope and momentary despondency had prevailed for several weeks, when the affectionate girl entered an apartment that communicated with George's own room, where she found the invalid reclining on a settee apparently deeply communing with himself.
Their report served but to increase the general despondency. They had followed Mr.
When the peasants, with their singing, had vanished out of sight and hearing, a weary feeling of despondency at his own isolation, his physical inactivity, his alienation from this world, came over Levin.
A few words to Joe as he mounted his horse sufficiently explained what had passed, and renewed all that young gentleman's despondency with tenfold aggravation.
He paused, looking at the money with bitter despondency.
She was humiliated to find herself a mere victim of feeling, as if she could know nothing except through that medium: all her strength was scattered in fits of agitation, of struggle, of despondency, and then again in visions of more complete renunciation, transforming all hard conditions into duty.