despot


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des·pot

 (dĕs′pət)
n.
1. A ruler with absolute power.
2. A person who wields power oppressively; a tyrant.
3.
a. A Byzantine emperor or prince.
b. An Eastern Orthodox bishop or patriarch.

[French despote, from Medieval Latin despota, from Greek despotēs, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

des·pot′ic (dĭ-spŏt′ĭk) adj.
des·pot′i·cal·ly adv.

despot

(ˈdɛspɒt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an absolute or tyrannical ruler; autocrat or tyrant
2. any person in power who acts tyrannically
3. (Historical Terms) a title borne by numerous persons of rank in the later Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Empires: the despot of Servia.
[C16: from Medieval Latin despota, from Greek despotēs lord, master; related to Latin domus house]
despotic, desˈpotical adj
desˈpotically adv

des•pot

(ˈdɛs pət, -pɒt)

n.
1. a king or other ruler with absolute, unlimited power; autocrat.
2. any tyrant or oppressor.
3. a title applied to a Byzantine emperor, and later to Byzantine vassal rulers and governors.
[1555–65; < Greek despótēs master; compare host1]
des•pot•ic (dɪˈspɒt ɪk) des•pot′i•cal, adj.
des•pot′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.despot - a cruel and oppressive dictatordespot - a cruel and oppressive dictator  
czar - a person having great power
potentate, dictator - a ruler who is unconstrained by law

despot

noun tyrant, dictator, totalitarian, Big Brother, oppressor, control freak, autocrat, monocrat He described the president as a ruthless despot.

despot

noun
1. An absolute ruler, especially one who is harsh and oppressive:
2. One who imposes or favors absolute obedience to authority:
Translations
طاغٍ، مُسْتَبِد
despotatyran
despotdiktatortyran
despotakényúrzsarnok
einræîisherra
despotasdespotiškaidespotiškasdespotizmas
despots
despota
despot

despot

[ˈdespɒt] Ndéspota mf

despot

[ˈdɛspɒt] n (= tyrant) → despote mf

despot

n (lit, fig)Despot(in) m(f)

despot

[ˈdɛspɒt] ndespota m

despot

(ˈdespot) , ((American) -pət) noun
a person (usually the king or ruler of a country) with absolute power, often a tyrant.
deˈspotic adjective
deˈspotically adverb
ˈdespotism (-pə-) noun
absolute power or tyranny.
References in classic literature ?
The skeleton of even the most lawless despot makes a good constitutional sovereign.
An earthly despotism would be the absolutely perfect earthly government, if the conditions were the same, namely, the despot the perfectest individual of the human race, and his lease of life perpetual.
The Emperor of Morocco is a soulless despot, and the great officers under him are despots on a smaller scale.
Despotism is unjust to everybody, including the despot, who was probably made for better things.
When I have been travelling up and down on our boats, or about on my collecting tours, and reflected that every brutal, disgusting, mean, low-lived fellow I met, was allowed by our laws to become absolute despot of as many men, women and children, as he could cheat, steal, or gamble money enough to buy,--when I have seen such men in actual ownership of helpless children, of young girls and women,--I have been ready to curse my country, to curse the human race
like machines, they dumbly moved about the deck, ever conscious that the old man's despot eye was on them.
There was hardly any sort of bloodshed which I would not pardon in those days to the slayers of tyrants; and the swagger form of such as despatched a despot with a fine speech was so much to my liking that I could only grieve that I was born too late to do and to say those things.
Yet all that was visible of the despot who ruled his whole household in deadly fear was the kindly and beautiful face of an elderly man, whose stunted limbs and body were mercifully concealed.
As if a benevolent despot might not by any error of judgment destroy his kingdom, and then say, like Romeo when he got his friend killed,
In a few months he gave up the task, and little more than a year later the people who had wept at the death of the great Protector, were madly rejoicing at the return of a despot.
One hundred and seventy-three despots would surely be as oppressive as one.
The public is despotic in its temper; it is capable of denying common justice when too strenuously demanded as a right; but quite as frequently it awards more than justice, when the appeal is made, as despots love to have it made, entirely to its generosity.