destructor


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de·struc·tor

 (dĭ-strŭk′tər)
n.
1. An incinerator for refuse.
2. An explosive, usually remote-controlled device for effecting a destruct.

destructor

(dɪˈstrʌktə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a furnace or incinerator for the disposal of refuse, esp one that uses the resulting heat to generate power
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a device used to blow up a dangerously defective missile or rocket after launching
Translations

destructor

[dɪsˈtrʌktəʳ] N (Brit) (also refuse destructor) → incinerador m de basuras, quemador m de basuras

destructor

n (Tech: also refuse destructor) → Müllverbrennungsanlage f

destructor

[dɪsˈtrʌktəʳ] n (for refuse) → inceneritore m
References in classic literature ?
You suppose that I am a terrorist, now--a destructor of what is, But consider that the true destroyers are they who destroy the spirit of progress and truth, not the avengers who merely kill the bodies of the persecutors of human dignity.
Mine inventories included general-purpose bombs fitted with mines, known as Destructors, which saw widespread employment at sea and on land during the Vietnam War.
1--The words harm and destructor are referred in traditions.
Wild bees would normally be able to throw off infections caused by Varroa destructor mites, but domesticated varieties are less able to do so.
ON THIS DAY April 26, 1940: A plea went out for people to save metal, iron, steel and brass for the war effort and take them to Hillhouse Sanitary Depot or the Destructor at St Andrew's Road.
UDPP/C/1/26) details the damage to council properties, including the schools at Cilfynydd, the gas manager's house, the gas works building, the electricity generating station, the tramway shelter at the terminus at Cilfynydd, the refuse destructor at Treforest and the complete demolition of the Cilfynydd Fire Station where "certain of the fire appliances had been blown away and could not be found.
5 overs, with Manna the chief destructor with figures of six for 62.
While once common, most feral honey bees were knocked out by the Varroa destructor mite that was introduced in 1987.
Reault maintained, the report said the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, remains the single most detrimental pest of honey bees and is closely associated with overwintering colony decline.
Over the past few decades, a vampire-like parasitic mite, Varroa Destructor, has swept across the world, decimating bee populations.
The introduction and spread of parasitic arthropods of honey bees, Acarapis woodi, Varroa destructor and Aethina nutida have been tagged the major cause of decline in the population of both feral and managed honey bee colonies [13, 14, 15, 16].