determinate


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Related to determinate: determinate growth

de·ter·mi·nate

 (dĭ-tûr′mə-nĭt)
adj.
1. Precisely limited or defined; definite: a determinate number; a determinate distance.
2. Conclusively settled; final.
3. Firm in purpose; resolute.
4. Botany
a. Terminating in a flower and blooming in a sequence beginning with the uppermost or central flower: a determinate inflorescence.
b. Not continuing indefinitely at the tip of an axis: determinate growth.

[Middle English, from Latin dēterminātus, past participle of dētermināre, to determine; see determine.]

de·ter′mi·nate·ly adv.
de·ter′mi·nate·ness n.

determinate

(dɪˈtɜːmɪnɪt)
adj
1. definitely limited, defined, or fixed; distinct
2. a less common word for determined
3. (Logic)
a. able to be predicted or deduced
b. (of an effect) obeying the law of causality
4. (Botany) botany (of an inflorescence) having the main and branch stems ending in flowers and unable to grow further; cymose
5. (of a structure, stress, etc) able to be fully analysed or determined
deˈterminately adv
deˈterminateness n

de•ter•mi•nate

(dɪˈtɜr mə nɪt)

adj.
1. having defined limits; definite.
2. settled; positive.
3. conclusive; final.
4. (of an inflorescence) having the primary and each secondary stem ending in a flower or bud.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin dēterminātus, past participle of dētermināre. See determine, -ate1]
de•ter′mi•nate•ly, adv.
de•ter′mi•nate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.determinate - precisely determined or limited or defined; especially fixed by rule or by a specific and constant cause; "a determinate distance"; "a determinate number"; "determinate variations in animals"
indeterminate, undetermined - not precisely determined or established; not fixed or known in advance; "of indeterminate age"; "a zillion is a large indeterminate number"; "an indeterminate point of law"; "the influence of environment is indeterminate"; "an indeterminate future"
2.determinate - not continuing to grow indefinitely at the apex; "determinate growth"
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
indeterminate - having a capacity for continuing to grow at the apex; "an indeterminate stem"
3.determinate - supplying or being a final or conclusive settlement; "a definitive verdict"; "a determinate answer to the problem"
conclusive - forming an end or termination; especially putting an end to doubt or question; "conclusive proof"; "the evidence is conclusive"

determinate

adjective definite, decided, certain, limited, established, express, determined, settled, positive, fixed, defined, absolute, precise, distinct, specified, decisive, explicit, definitive, conclusive, quantified the exclusive possession of land for some determinate period

determinate

adjective
Having distinct limits:
Translations

determinate

[dɪˈtɜːmɪnɪt] ADJ (frm) (= fixed) → determinado (Jur) [sentence] → definitivo

determinate

[dɪˈtɜːrmɪnət] adj (= specific) → déterminé(e)

determinate

adj number, period etcbestimmt, begrenzt; conceptfestgelegt; directionbestimmt
References in classic literature ?
This principle was sufficient thenceforward to rid me of all those repentings and pangs of remorse that usually disturb the consciences of such feeble and uncertain minds as, destitute of any clear and determinate principle of choice, allow themselves one day to adopt a course of action as the best, which they abandon the next, as the opposite.
These nine years passed away, however, before I had come to any determinate judgment respecting the difficulties which form matter of dispute among the learned, or had commenced to seek the principles of any philosophy more certain than the vulgar.
the change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,' or that 'whatever has extension is divisible,' these propositions are to be understood of motion and extension in general; and nevertheless it will not follow that they suggest to my thoughts an idea of motion without a body moved, or any determinate direction and velocity, or that I must conceive an abstract general idea of extension, which is neither line, surface, nor solid, neither great nor small, black, white, nor red, nor of any other determinate colour.
There was an infinity of firmest fortitude, a determinate unsurrenderable wilfulness, in the fixed and fearless, forward dedication of that glance.
And unless it can be shown that the circumstances which may affect the public safety are reducible within certain determinate limits; unless the contrary of this position can be fairly and rationally disputed, it must be admitted, as a necessary consequence, that there can be no limitation of that authority which is to provide for the defense and protection of the community, in any matter essential to its efficacy that is, in any matter essential to the FORMATION, DIRECTION, or SUPPORT of the NATIONAL FORCES.
Jennings could not quit Cleveland during the Dashwoods' stay; and Colonel Brandon was soon brought, by their united request, to consider his own abode there as equally determinate, if not equally indispensable.
The determinate qualification covers a larger field in the case of the genus that in that of the species: he who uses the word 'animal' is herein using a word of wider extension than he who uses the word 'man'.
His excellency, having mounted on the small of my right leg, advanced forwards up to my face, with about a dozen of his retinue; and producing his credentials under the signet royal, which he applied close to my eyes, spoke about ten minutes without any signs of anger, but with a kind of determinate resolution, often pointing forwards, which, as I afterwards found, was towards the capital city, about half a mile distant; whither it was agreed by his majesty in council that I must be conveyed.
Price: he assisted her liberally in the education and disposal of her sons as they became old enough for a determinate pursuit; and Fanny, though almost totally separated from her family, was sensible of the truest satisfaction in hearing of any kindness towards them, or of anything at all promising in their situation or conduct.
Legree had had the slumbering moral elements in him roused by his encounters with Tom,--roused, only to be resisted by the determinate force of evil; but still there was a thrill and commotion of the dark, inner world, produced by every word, or prayer, or hymn, that reacted in superstitious dread.
The mental structure is even less determinate than the bodily.
Considering that Fred was not at all coarse, that he rather looked down on the manners and speech of young men who had not been to the university, and that he had written stanzas as pastoral and unvoluptuous as his flute-playing, his attraction towards Bambridge and Horrock was an interesting fact which even the love of horse-flesh would not wholly account for without that mysterious influence of Naming which determinates so much of mortal choice.

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