detonation


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det·o·na·tion

 (dĕt′n-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act of exploding.
2. An explosion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

detonation

(ˌdɛtəˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an explosion or the act of exploding
2. (Automotive Engineering) the spontaneous combustion in an internal-combustion engine of part of the mixture before it has been reached by the flame front, causing the engine to knock
3. (General Physics) physics rapid combustion, esp that occurring within a shock wave
ˈdetoˌnative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

det•o•na•tion

(ˌdɛt nˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of detonating.
2. an explosion.
[1670–80; < French]
det′o•na`tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detonation - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reactiondetonation - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
discharge - the sudden giving off of energy
airburst - an explosion in the atmosphere
blast - an explosion (as of dynamite)
backfire - a loud noise made by the explosion of fuel in the manifold or exhaust of an internal combustion engine
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
backfire, blowback - the backward escape of gases and unburned gunpowder after a gun is fired
fragmentation - the scattering of bomb fragments after the bomb explodes
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
2.detonation - the act of detonating an explosive
burst, explosion - the act of exploding or bursting; "the explosion of the firecrackers awoke the children"; "the burst of an atom bomb creates enormous radiation aloft"
percussion - the act of exploding a percussion cap
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

detonation

noun
1. explosion, blast, bang, report, crack, boom, discharge, fulmination a heavy detonation echoed round the housing estate
2. blowing-up, explosion, discharge the accidental detonation of nuclear weapons
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

detonation

noun
A violent release of confined energy, usually accompanied by a loud sound and shock waves:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إنْفِجار، تَفْجير
výbuch
detonationsprængning
pamahduspaukkuräjähdys
detonációrobbanás
sprenging
patla ma

detonation

[ˌdetəˈneɪʃən] Ndetonación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

detonation

[ˌdɛtəˈneɪʃən] n
(= explosion) → détonation f
[weapon, bomb] → explosion f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

detonation

nZündung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

detonation

[ˌdɛtəˈneɪʃn] ndetonazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

detonate

(ˈdetəneit) verb
to (cause to) explode violently. This device detonates the bomb.
ˌdetoˈnation noun
an explosion.
ˈdetonator noun
something (especially a piece of equipment) that sets off an explosion.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
But an unforeseen circumstance, viz., the detonation produced by the Columbiad, had the immediate effect of troubling the terrestrial atmosphere, by accumulating a large quantity of vapor, a phenomenon which excited universal indignation, for the moon was hidden from the eyes of the watchers for several nights.
As if in answer, a great screaming roar went up, dim with distance, punctuated with detonation after detonation.
About six in the evening, as I sat at tea with my wife in the summerhouse talking vigorously about the battle that was lowering upon us, I heard a muffled detonation from the common, and immediately after a gust of firing.
At the same instant a terrific detonation split the ears; and when I rose on the next bald billow, where the ship lay burning a few seconds before, there remained but a red-hot spine that hissed and dwindled for another minute, and then left a blackness through which every star shone with redoubled brilliance.
The poor fellow imagined that he could already feel the enormous paws of the savage beast in his flesh, when a second detonation resounded in the narrow passage, and Dr.
the din of all the great double petards of the Saint-Jean, the discharge of twenty arquebuses on supports, the detonation of that famous serpentine of the Tower of Billy, which, during the siege of Paris, on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of September, 1465, killed seven Burgundians at one blow, the explosion of all the powder stored at the gate of the Temple, would have rent his ears less rudely at that solemn and dramatic moment, than these few words, which fell from the lips of the usher, "His eminence, Monseigneur the Cardinal de Bourbon."
"Without reckoning," added Aramis, "that the detonation might occasion a collapse of the cavern."
And then, just as she caught up, he in full stride, and she leaping with nose at his knee, there was a sudden flash, a burst of smoke, a terrific detonation, and where man and dog had been the instant before there was naught to be seen but a big hole in the ground.
It startled him more than the small and distant detonation that had come just before.
The silence which followed the detonation of the exploding torpedo was almost equally horrifying.
And yet on this unstable and death-terrific substance of which he was well aware Van Horn was composed, he trod heavily with his personality, daring, to the verge of detonation, to impact it with his insolence.
It was time; for they had scarcely sailed half a league, when D'Artagnan saw a flash and heard a detonation. It was the cannon which announced the closing of the port.