detract

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de·tract

 (dĭ-trăkt′)
v. de·tract·ed, de·tract·ing, de·tracts
v.tr.
To draw or take away; divert: They could detract little from so solid an argument.
v.intr.
To reduce the value, importance, or quality of something. Often used with from: testimony that only detracts from the strength of the plaintiff's case.

[Middle English detracten, from Latin dētrahere, dētract-, to remove : dē-, de- + trahere, to pull.]

de·trac′tor n.

detract

(dɪˈtrækt)
vb
1. (when: intr, usually foll by from) to take away a part (of); diminish: her anger detracts from her beauty.
2. (tr) to distract or divert
3. (tr) obsolete to belittle or disparage
[C15: from Latin dētractus drawn away, from dētrahere to pull away, disparage, from de- + trahere to drag]
deˈtractingly adv
deˈtractive, deˈtractory adj
deˈtractively adv
deˈtractor n
deˈtractress fem n
Usage: Detract is sometimes wrongly used where distract is meant: a noise distracted (not detracted) my attention

de•tract

(dɪˈtrækt)

v.i.
1. to take away a part, as from value or reputation (usu. fol. by from).
v.t.
2. to divert; distract: to detract attention from a problem.
3. Archaic. to take away.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French detracter) < Latin dētractus, past participle of dētrahere to detach, draw off =dē- de- + trahere to draw]
de•trac′tor, n.

detract


Past participle: detracted
Gerund: detracting

Imperative
detract
detract
Present
I detract
you detract
he/she/it detracts
we detract
you detract
they detract
Preterite
I detracted
you detracted
he/she/it detracted
we detracted
you detracted
they detracted
Present Continuous
I am detracting
you are detracting
he/she/it is detracting
we are detracting
you are detracting
they are detracting
Present Perfect
I have detracted
you have detracted
he/she/it has detracted
we have detracted
you have detracted
they have detracted
Past Continuous
I was detracting
you were detracting
he/she/it was detracting
we were detracting
you were detracting
they were detracting
Past Perfect
I had detracted
you had detracted
he/she/it had detracted
we had detracted
you had detracted
they had detracted
Future
I will detract
you will detract
he/she/it will detract
we will detract
you will detract
they will detract
Future Perfect
I will have detracted
you will have detracted
he/she/it will have detracted
we will have detracted
you will have detracted
they will have detracted
Future Continuous
I will be detracting
you will be detracting
he/she/it will be detracting
we will be detracting
you will be detracting
they will be detracting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been detracting
you have been detracting
he/she/it has been detracting
we have been detracting
you have been detracting
they have been detracting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been detracting
you will have been detracting
he/she/it will have been detracting
we will have been detracting
you will have been detracting
they will have been detracting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been detracting
you had been detracting
he/she/it had been detracting
we had been detracting
you had been detracting
they had been detracting
Conditional
I would detract
you would detract
he/she/it would detract
we would detract
you would detract
they would detract
Past Conditional
I would have detracted
you would have detracted
he/she/it would have detracted
we would have detracted
you would have detracted
they would have detracted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.detract - take away a part from; diminish; "His bad manners detract from his good character"
cut down, reduce, trim back, trim down, cut, cut back, trim, bring down - cut down on; make a reduction in; "reduce your daily fat intake"; "The employer wants to cut back health benefits"

detract

verb
To think, represent, or speak of as small or unimportant:
phrasal verb
detract from
To spoil the soundness or perfection of:
Translations

detract

[dɪˈtrækt] VI to detract from [+ value] → quitar mérito or valor a; [+ reputation] → empañar

detract

[dɪˈtrækt] vi
to detract from [+ quality, pleasure, achievement] → enlever à; [+ reputation, effect] → nuire à

detract

vi to detract from somethingetw beeinträchtigen, einer Sache (dat)Abbruch tun; from pleasure, merit alsoetw schmälern

detract

[dɪˈtrækt] vi to detract from (value) → sminuire; (reputation) → intaccare; (pleasure) → attenuare
References in classic literature ?
Shakespeare is fine enough and great enough when all the possible detractions are made, and I have no fear of saying now that he would be finer and greater for the loss of half his work, though if I had heard any one say such a thing then I should have held him as little better than one of the wicked.
She could not greatly influence her daughter-in-law against me, because, between that lady and herself there was a mutual dislike--chiefly shown by her in secret detractions and calumniations; by the other, in an excess of frigid formality in her demeanour; and no fawning flattery of the elder could thaw away the wall of ice which the younger interposed between them.
And the philosopher holding converse with the divine order, becomes orderly and divine, as far as the nature of man allows; but like every one else, he will suffer from detraction.
Henri, regardless that envy stared and detraction whispered whenever I approached her.
I regretted it especially," he resumed, taking the usual course from detraction to insincere eulogy, "because of my gratitude and respect towards my cousin.
I offer you, now, no distinction among a bustling crowd; no mingling with a world of malice and detraction, where the blood is called into honest cheeks by aught but real disgrace and shame; but a home--a heart and home--yes, dearest Rose, and those, and those alone, are all I have to offer.
I have said enough in answer to the charge of Meletus: any elaborate defence is unnecessary, but I know only too well how many are the enmities which I have incurred, and this is what will be my destruction if I am destroyed;--not Meletus, nor yet Anytus, but the envy and detraction of the world, which has been the death of many good men, and will probably be the death of many more; there is no danger of my being the last of them.
Before the coming of the Scientific Age this group of gentle and noble emotions had been a fine factor in the equipment of every worthy human being, a fine factor that had its less amiable aspect in a usually harmless hostility to strange people, and a usually harmless detraction of strange lands.
Through the consideration of these Antidotes against Detractions, temper the manifold malapertnesse of thy tongue, of thy tempting tongue, of thy tickling tongue, of thy tattling tongue, thy taunting tongue, thy vaunting tongue, thy jesting tongue, thy gibing tongue, thy jarring tongue, thy warring tongue, thy checking tongue, thy chiding tongue, thy clattering tongue, thy clacking tongue, thy carping tongue, thy babling tongue, thy boasting tongue, thy blazing tongue, thy reviling tongue, thy scoffing tongue, thy scolding tongue, thy nicking tongue, thy nipping tongue, thy quipping tongue, thy tripping tongue, thy defaming tongue, thy detracting tongue; temper the phreneticall furie of this little Tyrant.
Despite these detractions, Cameron has opened the door to further exploration of Abolitionist movements in the North well before historians generally consider there to be an organized or effective movement.
These detractions occur against a background of local logistical challenges, limited time constraints, culture shock, students falling sick, as well as becoming targets of thieves, and other risks, some of which can be potentially life-threatening.
Other detractions are the multiplicity of driveways that snarl traffic and the plethora of utility poles that hamper sidewalk navigation.