detractor


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

de·tract

 (dĭ-trăkt′)
v. de·tract·ed, de·tract·ing, de·tracts
v.tr.
To draw or take away; divert: They could detract little from so solid an argument.
v.intr.
To reduce the value, importance, or quality of something. Often used with from: testimony that only detracts from the strength of the plaintiff's case.

[Middle English detracten, from Latin dētrahere, dētract-, to remove : dē-, de- + trahere, to pull.]

de·trac′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detractor - one who disparages or belittles the worth of something
cynic, faultfinder - someone who is critical of the motives of others
backbiter, defamer, libeler, maligner, slanderer, traducer, vilifier - one who attacks the reputation of another by slander or libel
hatemonger - one who arouses hatred for others
muckraker, mudslinger - one who spreads real or alleged scandal about another (usually for political advantage)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

detractor

noun slanderer, belittler, disparager, defamer, traducer, muckraker, scandalmonger, denigrator, backbiter, derogator (rare) This performance will silence the majority of his detractors.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

detractor

[dɪˈtræktəʳ] Ndetractor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

detractor

[dɪˈtræktər] ndétracteur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

detractor

nKritiker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

detractor

[dɪˈtræktəʳ] ndetrattore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He had performed many eminent services for the crown, had great natural and acquired parts, adorned with integrity and honour; but so ill an ear for music, that his detractors reported, "he had been often known to beat time in the wrong place;" neither could his tutors, without extreme difficulty, teach him to demonstrate the most easy proposition in the mathematics.
The warmest partisans of the enterprise now became its most ardent detractors. Reaction mounted from the crew to the captain himself, and certainly, had it not been for the resolute determination on the part of Captain Farragut, the frigate would have headed due southward.
It is still possible to discuss his place in art, and the adulation of his admirers is perhaps no less capricious than the disparagement of his detractors; but one thing can never be doubtful, and that is that he had genius.
Manson Mingott had become known--her cynicism was held to exceed his; and she had not the excuse--nor her detractors the satisfaction-- of pleading that she was "a foreigner." It was some comfort (to those whose securities were not in jeopardy) to be able to remind themselves that Beaufort WAS; but, after all, if a Dallas of South Carolina took his view of the case, and glibly talked of his soon being "on his feet again," the argument lost its edge, and there was nothing to do but to accept this awful evidence of the indissolubility of marriage.
These attempts did not prevent the cardinal, to whom his most inveterate detractors have never denied personal bravery, from making nocturnal excursions, sometimes to communicate to the Duc d'Angouleme important orders, sometimes to confer with the king, and sometimes to have an interview with a messenger whom he did not wish to see at home.
Was I not certain that she, in intellect, in purity and elevation of soul, was immeasurably superior to any of her detractors; that she was, in fact, the noblest, the most adorable, of her sex I had ever beheld, or even imagined to exist?
Not much time will be gained, O Athenians, in return for the evil name which you will get from the detractors of the city, who will say that you killed Socrates, a wise man; for they will call me wise, even although I am not wise, when they want to reproach you.
Another Hooda detractor, former Union minister Kumari Selja, has also criticised his style of functioning.
Top 3 life insurers for consumer loyalty Net Promoter Score (NPS) 45 1st: State Farm Net Promoter Score (NPS) Detractor (14%) Passive (28%) Promoter (58%) Net Promoter Score 34 2nd: NY Life Detractor (21%) Passive (24%) Promoter (55%) Net Promoter Score 29 3rd: Allstate Detractor (21%) Passive (28%) Promoter (51%) Note: Table made from bar graph.
Not so much by the "defamation", but rather by the creation of a seemingly new category of criminal - 'detractor'.
While all companies long for an advocate to sing the praises of its products and services, none want a detractor. Fortunately, with the increased emphasis on improved customer service and the growing advances in call center technology, it is easier than ever for companies to train and equip call center agents with the tools needed to create advocates and placate detractors.
London, April 1 (ANI): A British couple has received a threatning letter from an anonymous detractor for trimming one of their bushes into the shape of 'Buddha' in their five-bedroom 1850 home, Hill House Garden and Nursery, near Ashburton in south Devon.