deuce


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deuce 1

 (do͞os, dyo͞os)
n.
1.
a. A playing card having two spots or the side of a die bearing two pips.
b. A cast of dice totaling two.
2. A tied score in tennis in which each player or side has 40 points, or 5 or more games, and one player or side must win 2 successive points to win the game, or 2 successive games to win the set.
tr.v. deuced, deuc·ing, deuc·es
To make the score of (a tennis game or set) deuce.

[Middle English deus, from Old French, two, from Latin duōs, masculine accusative of duo; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

deuce 2

 (do͞os, dyo͞os) Informal
n.
1. The devil: "Love is a bodily infirmity ... which breaks out the deuce knows how or why" (William Makepeace Thackeray).
2. An outstanding example, especially of something difficult or bad: a deuce of a family row.
3. A severe reprimand or expression of anger: got the deuce for being late.
4. Used as an intensive: What the deuce were they thinking of?

[Probably from Low German duus, a throw of two in dice games, bad luck, ultimately from Latin duo, two; see deuce1.]

deuce

(djuːs)
n
1. (Card Games)
a. a playing card or dice with two pips or spots; two
b. a throw of two in dice
2. (Games, other than specified)
a. a playing card or dice with two pips or spots; two
b. a throw of two in dice
3. (Tennis) tennis a tied score (in tennis 40-all) that requires one player to gain two successive points to win the game
[C15: from Old French deus two, from Latin duos, accusative masculine of duo two]

deuce

(djuːs)
interj
an expression of annoyance or frustration
n
the deuce (intensifier) used in such phrases as what the deuce, where the deuce, etc
[C17: probably special use of deuce1 (in the sense: lowest throw at dice)]

deuce1

(dus, dyus)

n.
1. a card having two pips.
2.
a. the face of a die having two pips.
b. a cast or point of two in dice.
3. a situation, as a tied score in a game, in which a player must score two successive points or games to win.
[1425–75; < Middle French: two < Latin duōs]

deuce2

(dus, dyus)

n.
devil; dickens (used as a mild oath): Where the deuce did they hide it?
[1645–55; appar. identical with deuce1]

deuce

The score after each player has scored three points (40–all). Deuce is also the score of any tied result after 40–all in the same game. If both players score advantage, the score is deuce once more until one player wins two consecutive points to win a game.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deuce - a tie in tennis or table tennis that requires winning two successive points to win the game
tie - equality of score in a contest
2.deuce - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this numberdeuce - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number
2, II, two
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
craps, snake eyes - expressions used when when two dice are thrown and both come up showing one spot
couplet, distich, duad, duet, duo, dyad, twain, twosome, brace, pair, span, yoke, couple - two items of the same kind
3.deuce - a word used in exclamations of confusion; "what the devil"; "the deuce with it"; "the dickens you say"
exclaiming, exclamation - an abrupt excited utterance; "she gave an exclamation of delight"; "there was much exclaiming over it"
4.deuce - one of the four playing cards in a deck that have two spots
playing card - one of a pack of cards that are used to play card games
Translations
двойка
dvojka
kakkonenpirusorsatasatilanne
dvojka
duo
dvojka

deuce

1 [djuːs] N (Tennis) → cuarenta iguales mpl, deuce m

deuce

2 (o.f.) [djuːs] N a deuce of a rowun tremendo jaleo
a deuce of a messuna terrible confusión
the deuce it is!¡qué demonio!
what/where the deuce ...?¿qué/dónde demonios ...?
to play the deuce withestropear, echar a perder

deuce

[ˈdjuːs] n (TENNIS)égalité f

deuce

1
n
(Cards) → Zwei f
(Tennis) → Einstand m; after ten deucesnachdem es zehnmal Einstand gegeben hatte; to be at deuceden Einstand erreicht haben

deuce

2
n (dated inf)Teufel m ? devil N c

deuce

[djuːs] n (Tennis) → deuce m inv, quaranta pari m inv
References in classic literature ?
He couldn't play any longer at innocence; so how the deuce would he get out of it?
I felt what a forlorn little chap Timothy was, with no one to say a word for him, and I became his champion and hinted something about teething, but withdrew it when it seemed too surprising, and tried to get on to safer ground, such as bibs and general intelligence, but the painter fellow was so willing to let me have my say, and knew so much more about babies than is fitting for men to know, that I paled before him and wondered why the deuce he was listening to me so attentively.
"The deuce! the deuce!" repeated La Fontaine; "what can I do?"
"And why the deuce are we going to fight Bonaparte?" remarked Shinshin.
"The deuce! he has no money then, I suppose," said De Guiche, shrugging his shoulders.
"What the deuce is she thinking of?" thought Gringoire, staring at what she was gazing at; "'tis impossible that it can be that stone dwarf carved in the keystone of that arch, which thus absorbs her attention.
Rising, Rouletabille exclaimed again: "The deuce!" Presently he added: "Yet I believe Monsieur Robert Darzac to be an honest man." He then led me on the road to the Donjon Inn, which we could see on the highway, by the side of a small clump of trees.
"What the deuce was the good of my telling you what any tom-fools talked about?"
The 'walk in' was uttered with closed teeth, and expressed the sentiment, 'Go to the Deuce:' even the gate over which he leant manifested no sympathising movement to the words; and I think that circumstance determined me to accept the invitation: I felt interested in a man who seemed more exaggeratedly reserved than myself.
I wished a round score of men--in case of natives, buccaneers, or the odious French--and I had the worry of the deuce itself to find so much as half a dozen, till the most remarkable stroke of fortune brought me the very man that I required.
"The deuce! I was going to tell you there's one thing that worries me-- my burner!"
"The deuce you say!" replied the marquis, "let us lose no time, then!"