deus ex machina


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de·us ex ma·chi·na

(dā′əs ĕks mä′kə-nə, -nä′, măk′ə-nə)
n.
1. In Greek and Roman drama, a god lowered by stage machinery to resolve a plot or extricate the protagonist from a difficult situation.
2. An unexpected, artificial, or improbable character, device, or event introduced suddenly in a work of fiction or drama to resolve a situation or untangle a plot.
3. A person or event that provides a sudden and unexpected solution to a difficulty.

[New Latin deus ex māchinā : Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots + Latin ex, from; see eghs in Indo-European roots + Latin māchinā, ablative of māchina, machine; see machine. Translation of Greek theos apo mēkhanēs).]

deus ex machina

(ˈdeɪʊs ɛks ˈmækɪnə)
n
1. (Theatre) (in ancient Greek and Roman drama) a god introduced into a play to resolve the plot
2. (Theatre) any unlikely or artificial device serving this purpose
[literally: god out of a machine, translating Greek theos ek mēkhanēs]

de•us ex ma•chi•na

(ˈdeɪ əs ɛks ˈmɑ kə nə, ˈdi əs ɛks ˈmæk ə nə)
n.
1. (in classical drama) a god introduced into a play to resolve the entanglements of the plot.
2. any artificial or improbable device resolving the difficulties of a plot.
[1690–1700; < New Latin, literally, god from a machine (i.e., stage machinery from which a deity's statue was lowered)]

deus ex machina

the device of resolving dramatic action by the introduction of an unexpected, improbable, or forced character or incident.
See also: Drama

deus ex machina

A Latin phrase meaning god out of a machine, used to mean a contrived, unlikely solution to a problem.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deus ex machina - any active agent who appears unexpectedly to solve an insoluble difficulty
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
Translations
deus ex machina

deus ex machina

References in classic literature ?
It is therefore evident that the unravelling of the plot, no less than the complication, must arise out of the plot itself, it must not be brought about by the 'Deus ex Machina'--as in the Medea, or in the Return of the Greeks in the Iliad.
He also, with strained plaintiveness, scribbles "Deus Ex Machina" in a notebook.
For his part, while Jake is no slouch at acting, he largely owes his participation to a deus ex machina device utilized to ease the movie into the white-knuckle moment of its 'twisted' denouement.
All night the Little Admiral hung from a beam directly above Michael's increasingly squiffy head on a thread, a deus ex machina peering down with detached amusement on the insomniac crew and their games of double bluff and murderous camaraderie.
Events in the last few weeks in the politic of Oyo State may well be proving that many of those who disagree with the politics of Governor Abiola Ajimobi may have underrated the inbuilt political deftness, wizardry and perhaps, his ability to swing a measure of deus ex machina into the surface of his politics.
Nowlin keep a tight grip on the tone and the relentless pace, but they often back the story and characters into corners that only a deus ex machina can fix.
Sci-fi computers have a habit of turning on their human creators, and while Skynet is probably the most iconic vision of the singularity, the Matrix and its Deus Ex Machina is another horrifying vision of our future.
Terms such as agency are well illustrated, while others, such as deus ex machina and related fictitious terms, have confusing, abstract definitions in conflict with the classics.
The SEC, like other government agencies, is in Stringham's view a deus ex machina, a "god from the machine." Stringham explains that the deus ex machina plot device "is named for Greek plays that used gods played by actors suspended on cranes to suddenly solve characters' problems" In many social science and policy debates, he writes, "theorists think of potential problems and assume government can solve them" Those who advocate government enforcement rarely explain why they think that governments will have the incentives or the information to do their job well.
If Gaby is a little 'Deus ex machina' it serves a purpose: the galloping momentum never pauses and the reader is satisfied with some answers.
In classical Greek tragedies, deus ex machina was a divinity appearing on the scene at the end of the play (descending from a wooden crane -- the machina) to provide a solution to the deadlock that the play had been led into.