deuteride


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deuteride

(ˈdjuːtəˌraɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a compound of deuterium with some other element. It is analogous to a hydride
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Iranian documents repeatedly mention a specific substance used for making neutron initiators: uranium deuteride.
In ITER, the D-T fuel is recommended to be stored as metal deuteride and tritide because solid-state hydrogen isotopes storage offers such advantages as safety, efficiency (higher bulk hydrogen storage density), and processing convenience over gas and liquid storage methods [7, 8].
He said: "Hydrogen bombs use lithium deuteride and it is not known if North Korea has the infrastructure to create such material.
Crenshaw, "The dissociation pressures of sodium deuteride and sodium hydride," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
Using Herschel, they were able to take a fresh look at the disk with the space telescope to analyze light coming from TW Hydrae and pick out the spectral signature of a gas called hydrogen deuteride. Simple hydrogen molecules are the main gas component of planets, but they emit light at wavelengths too short to be detected by Herschel.
It called on Iran to provide clarifications regarding "experiments involving the explosive compression of uranium deuteride to produce a short burst of neutrons."
He proposed to use lithium-6 deuteride, which would make tritium and facilitate deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.
The document revealed in The Times report described the use of a neutron source, uranium deuteride, which experts said had no possible use other than in a nuclear weapon.
The technical document describes the use of a neutron source, uranium deuteride, which is feared to have no possible civilian or military use other than in a nuclear weapon.
The document revealed in the The Times of London report described the use o= f a neutron source, uranium deuteride, which experts said had no possible u= se other than in a nuclear weapon.
So, on an afternoon somewhere in the Pacific, in the year before my birth, Teller and his minions supervised the wrapping of a regular, atomic bomb in a casing of lithium deuteride. This compound, when exposed to the immense heat of the atomic blast and the release of radiation, would do two things: first, it would transmute the lithium into tritium; second, it would fuse the tritium and the deuterium in the compound together.
When the beam struck a target of erbium deuteride, neutron particles were emitted from the target with precisely the energy expected if they were generated by the fusion of two deuterium nuclei.