devalorize

(redirected from devalorized)

devalorize

(diːˈvæləˌraɪz) or

devalorise

vb (tr)
1. (Economics) a variant form of devalue
2. a variant form of devalue
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Chaudhuri, "Retention of Electrocardiogram Features Insignificantly Devalorized as an Effect of Watermarking for a Multimodal Biometrie Authentication System", Advances in Biometrics for Secure Human Authentication and Recognition, CRC Press 2013, pp.
As de facto single men, (4) the CTI expats not only shared dirty (and often bluntly misogynist and racist) jokes, but also had fleeting encounters with women and girls from the labour compounds and the nearest town, whose 'blackness' was simultaneously eroticized and devalorized as 'easily available' and 'free for all'.
Work that conforms to masculine attributes is valorized, while work associated with feminine caring roles and service to others is devalorized. Organizational decisions about who is suitable to hire and train for particular jobs are based on, "images of appropriate gendered and racialized bodies" (Acker, 2006, p.
Even the virtually theological depth of the worker's condition, and of work, that marked the socialist and union movements for over a century, is becoming devalorized, as work becomes a control and manipulation of information.
The theory of intellect, especially in its extension to the divine particle in humanity, devalorized to a significant degree the contingent and volitional undergirding of infinity (say, of divinity) and stated the possibility of its being made operative in the intellectual grasp of the universe.
More ambitiously, his work describes an endgame where the very notion of identity as a central organizing structure must be devalorized to make coexistence possible.
They observe that a polyphony rather than cacophony of definitions and attitudes defined how work and workers were valorized and devalorized. Two major periods define their study, classical antiquity and from roughly 1300 to 1800, and they limit themselves to farmers, merchants, craftsmen and wage-workers in Western and Southern Europe.
The massive incorporation of devalorized migrant labour into the bottom structure of neo-liberal economies in the West has been made possible by the concurrent reorganization of transnational capitalist production, which has institutionalized new forms of employment and working practices.
The second of these contradictions, and one that is at least as provocative in its manifest declaration, is Richters semblance of an unmitigated loyalty to an essential, almost ontological bond between color and painting, as though chroma were in fact still and would always be an irreversible condition of paint- erly production--the implied argument being that color could be sustained at all times and under any circumstances, and that it could be resuscitated against all the forms of contestation that had historically devalorized it (from the advanced aesthetic models that had operated in a rather decisive and compelling manner in Conceptual art in the 1960s, for example, to the most advanced forms created with the assistance of technological devices in the digital age).
As peripatetic structures based on the felix culpa became marginalized as "irregular," and as the material extravagances of Baroque theater were devalorized, the form of drama could no longer convincingly represent the joys of commerce or the selfish motives that might drive characters to gamble their fortunes for future remuneration.
Burke turns to the insights of feminist scholars Ann Tickner (1992) and Christine Sylvester (2002) who argue that global security politics has been dominated by an image of 'hegemonic masculinity,' sustained through its antagonistic relation to various representations of devalorized insecure and vulnerable gender identities.
With Paulhan, the crisis of language gives rise to a mystified literature: it isn't about setting off in search of language; on the contrary, one ends up caring more about raising the stakes, so it's necessary that words become progressively devalorized, and language evermore ambiguous; literature tends less and less to be an expression of the world; it only wants to be the world's distortion.