deviance

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de·vi·ant

 (dē′vē-ənt)
adj.
Differing from a norm or from the accepted standards of a society.
n.
One that differs from a norm, especially a person whose behavior and attitudes differ from accepted social standards.

[Middle English deviaunt, from Late Latin dēviāns, dēviant-, present participle of dēviāre, to deviate; see deviate.]

de′vi·ance, de′vi·an·cy n.

deviance

(ˈdiːvɪəns)
n
1. Also called: deviancy the act or state of being deviant
2. (Statistics) statistics a measure of the degree of fit of a statistical model compared to that of a more complete model

de•vi•ance

(ˈdi vi əns)

also de′vi•an•cy,



n.
1. deviant quality or state.
2. deviant behavior.
[1940–45]

deviance

Divergence from the accepted social norms of behavior. Deviance can be beneficial to society if unorthodox behavior leads to creativity or innovation. Alternatively deviance may be harmful as in the case of crime.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deviance - a state or condition markedly different from the normdeviance - a state or condition markedly different from the norm
abnormalcy, abnormality - an abnormal physical condition resulting from defective genes or developmental deficiencies
chromosomal aberration, chromosomal anomaly, chromosonal disorder, chrosomal abnormality - any change in the normal structure or number of chromosomes; often results in physical or mental abnormalities
deflection, warp - a twist or aberration; especially a perverse or abnormal way of judging or acting
2.deviance - deviate behavior
irregularity, abnormality - behavior that breaches the rule or etiquette or custom or morality

deviance

noun
Translations
deviace
poikkeavuus

deviance

[ˈdiːvɪəns] deviancy [ˈdiːvɪənsɪ] N (gen) (also Psych) → desviación f

deviance

[ˈdiːviəns] ndéviance f

deviance

[ˈdiːvɪəns] ndevianza
References in periodicals archive ?
It's yet another bleak tale featuring murder, rape and other sexual deviancies.
Wilde was able to remind the Home Secretary that Max Nordau's Degeneration (1895), the period's most systematic and influential catalogue of moral-aesthetic deviancies, had 'devoted an entire chapter to the petitioner' (in fact, three pages of a chapter).