deviation

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de·vi·a·tion

 (dē′vē-ā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of deviating or turning aside.
b. An instance of this: "We made so many deviations up and down lanes ... that I was quite tired, and very glad, when we saw Yarmouth" (Charles Dickens).
2.
a. Divergence from an accepted idea, policy, or norm of behavior: "Freud, as the leader of a powerful new movement, could not bear much deviation from his own central ideas" (Joseph Epstein).
b. An instance of this; an abnormality or departure from a norm: "Vice was a deviation from our nature" (Henry Fielding).
3. Deflection of a compass needle caused by local magnetic influence, especially on a ship.
4. Statistics The difference, especially the absolute difference, between one number in a set of data and the mean of that set of data.

de′vi·a′tion·ism n.
de′vi·a′tion·ist adj. & n.
Synonyms: deviation, aberration, divergence
These nouns mean a departure from what is prescribed or expected: tolerates no deviation from the rules; an act that represented an aberration from his usual behavior; a doctrine seen as a divergence from previous beliefs.

deviation

(ˌdiːvɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. an act or result of deviating
2. (Statistics) statistics the difference between an observed value in a series of such values and their arithmetic mean
3. (Navigation) the error of a compass due to local magnetic disturbances

de•vi•a•tion

(ˌdi viˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of deviating.
2. departure from an accepted or established standard or norm.
3. the difference between one of a set of statistical values and some fixed value, usu. the mean of the set.
4. the error of a magnetic compass on a given heading as a result of local magnetism.
[1375–1425; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin]

de·vi·a·tion

(dē′vē-ā′shən)
Mathematics
The difference between one number in a set and the mean of the set.

deviation

1. The distance by which a point of impact or burst misses the target. See also circular error probable; delivery error; dispersion error; horizontal error.
2. The angular difference between magnetic and compass headings.

deviation

Conduct departing from the norm. Specifically, it is used to describe sexual perversions, such as a fetish or sadism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deviation - a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"
variation, fluctuation - an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change
variance, variant, discrepancy - an event that departs from expectations
driftage - the deviation (by a vessel or aircraft) from its intended course due to drifting
flection, flexion, inflection - deviation from a straight or normal course
2.deviation - the difference between an observed value and the expected value of a variable or function
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
statistic - a datum that can be represented numerically
outlier - an extreme deviation from the mean
mean deviation, mean deviation from the mean - the arithmetic mean of the absolute values of deviations from the mean of a distribution
3.deviation - the error of a compass due to local magnetic disturbances
erroneousness, error - inadvertent incorrectness
4.deviation - deviate behavior
irregularity, abnormality - behavior that breaches the rule or etiquette or custom or morality
5.deviation - a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern); "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"
turning, turn - the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right"
red herring - any diversion intended to distract attention from the main issue

deviation

deviation

noun
Translations
إنْحِراف
odchylkaúchylka
afvigelse
frávik
sapma

deviation

[ˌdiːvɪˈeɪʃən] Ndesviación f (from de)

deviation

[ˌdiːviˈeɪʃən] n (statistical)variation f
a deviation from [+ standard, normal practice] → une déviance de
a deviation from the norm → un écart par rapport à la norme

deviation

nAbweichen nt, → Abweichung f; deviation from the normAbweichung fvon der Norm

deviation

[ˌdiːvɪˈeɪʃn] n deviation (from)deviazione f (da)
standard deviation (Math) → scarto quadratico medio

deviate

(ˈdiːvieit) verb
to turn aside, especially from a right, normal or standard course. She will not deviate from her routine.
ˌdeviˈation noun

de·vi·a·tion

n. desviación, desvío.
1. alejamiento de una pauta establecida;
2. aberración mental; mala conducta, mal comportamiento.

deviation

n desviación f
References in classic literature ?
But the number and diversity of inheritable deviations of structure, both those of slight and those of considerable physiological importance, is endless.
Some of our highest and ablest men, men of real genius, have during their earliest days laboured under deviations as great as, or even greater than, forty-five minutes: and the loss of their precious lives would have been an irreparable injury to the State.
On the contrary, the deviations made from his theory were, in his opinion, the sole cause of the whole disaster, and with characteristically gleeful sarcasm he would remark, "There, I said the whole affair would go to the devil
Nay, they are deviations both of them equally from other forms, as I said at the beginning.
The staircase was as wooden and solid as need be, and Affery went straight down it without any of those deviations peculiar to dreams.
Some deviations, therefore, from the principle must be admitted.
Thus, to take a long and circuitous route, after enticing the enemy out of the way, and though starting after him, to contrive to reach the goal before him, shows knowledge of the artifice of DEVIATION.
The sun rose in the undoubted east and set in the undoubted west, corrected and proved, of course, by declination, deviation, and variation; and the nightly march of the stars and constellations proceeded across the sky.
But, inasmuch as it is equally necessary to take into account the deviation which the rotary motion of the earth will impart to the shot, and as the shot cannot reach the moon until after a deviation equal to 16 radii of the earth, which, calculated upon the moon's orbit, are equal to about eleven degrees, it becomes necessary to add these eleven degrees to those which express the retardation of the moon just mentioned: that is to say, in round numbers, about sixty-four degrees.
Do not blame him, however, for departing from his character, where the deviation is necessary.
It will not be wondered at that a creature who had so strict a regard to decency in her own person, should be shocked at the least deviation from it in another.
If it did not land there, there must have been some deviation.