deviate

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de·vi·ate

 (dē′vē-āt′)
v. de·vi·at·ed, de·vi·at·ing, de·vi·ates
v.intr.
1. To turn aside from a course or way: hikers who deviated from the main path.
2. To depart, as from a norm, purpose, or subject; differ or stray. See Synonyms at swerve.
v.tr.
To cause to turn aside or differ.
n. (-ĭt)
A deviant.

[Late Latin dēviāre, dēviāt- : Latin dē-, de- + Latin via, road; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

de′vi·a′tor n.
de′vi·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

deviate

vb
1. (usually intr) to differ or diverge or cause to differ or diverge, as in belief or thought
2. (usually intr) to turn aside or cause to turn aside; diverge or cause to diverge
3. (Psychology) (intr) psychol to depart from an accepted standard or convention
n, adj
(Sociology) another word for deviant
[C17: from Late Latin dēviāre to turn aside from the direct road, from de- + via road]
ˈdeviˌator n
ˈdeviatory adj

de•vi•ate

(v. ˈdi viˌeɪt; adj., n. -ɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj., n. v.i.
1. to turn aside, as from a route or course.
2. to depart, as from an accepted procedure, standard, or course of action.
3. to digress, as from a line of thought.
v.t.
4. to cause to swerve; turn aside.
adj.
5. characterized by deviation or departure from an accepted norm or standard, as of behavior.
n.
6. a person or thing that departs from the accepted norm or standard.
7. a person whose sexual behavior departs from the norm in a socially or morally unacceptable way.
[1625–35; < Late Latin dēviātus, past participle of dēviāre to turn into another road = Latin - de- + -viāre, derivative of via road, way]
de′vi•a`tor, n.
de′vi•a•to`ry (-əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) de′vi•a`tive, adj.
syn: deviate, digress, diverge imply turning or going aside from a path. To deviate is to stray from a usual or established standard, course of action, or route: Fear made him deviate from the truth. To digress is to wander from the main theme in speaking or writing: The speaker digressed to relate an amusing anecdote. To diverge is to differ or to move in different directions from a common point or course: Their interests gradually diverged.

deviate


Past participle: deviated
Gerund: deviating

Imperative
deviate
deviate
Present
I deviate
you deviate
he/she/it deviates
we deviate
you deviate
they deviate
Preterite
I deviated
you deviated
he/she/it deviated
we deviated
you deviated
they deviated
Present Continuous
I am deviating
you are deviating
he/she/it is deviating
we are deviating
you are deviating
they are deviating
Present Perfect
I have deviated
you have deviated
he/she/it has deviated
we have deviated
you have deviated
they have deviated
Past Continuous
I was deviating
you were deviating
he/she/it was deviating
we were deviating
you were deviating
they were deviating
Past Perfect
I had deviated
you had deviated
he/she/it had deviated
we had deviated
you had deviated
they had deviated
Future
I will deviate
you will deviate
he/she/it will deviate
we will deviate
you will deviate
they will deviate
Future Perfect
I will have deviated
you will have deviated
he/she/it will have deviated
we will have deviated
you will have deviated
they will have deviated
Future Continuous
I will be deviating
you will be deviating
he/she/it will be deviating
we will be deviating
you will be deviating
they will be deviating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deviating
you have been deviating
he/she/it has been deviating
we have been deviating
you have been deviating
they have been deviating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deviating
you will have been deviating
he/she/it will have been deviating
we will have been deviating
you will have been deviating
they will have been deviating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deviating
you had been deviating
he/she/it had been deviating
we had been deviating
you had been deviating
they had been deviating
Conditional
I would deviate
you would deviate
he/she/it would deviate
we would deviate
you would deviate
they would deviate
Past Conditional
I would have deviated
you would have deviated
he/she/it would have deviated
we would have deviated
you would have deviated
they would have deviated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deviate - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behaviordeviate - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
fetishist - one who engages in fetishism (especially of a sexual nature)
nympho, nymphomaniac - a woman with abnormal sexual desires
child molester, paederast - a man who has sex (usually sodomy) with a boy as the passive partner
miscreant, reprobate - a person without moral scruples
lech, lecher, letch, satyr - man with strong sexual desires
sodomist - someone who engages in anal copulation (especially a male who engages in anal copulation with another male)
Verb1.deviate - turn aside; turn away from
turn - change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense; "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs"
yaw - deviate erratically from a set course; "the yawing motion of the ship"
detour - travel via a detour
sidetrack, straggle, digress, depart - wander from a direct or straight course
2.deviate - be at variance withdeviate - be at variance with; be out of line with
aberrate - diverge or deviate from the straight path; produce aberration; "The surfaces of the concave lens may be proportioned so as to aberrate exactly equal to the convex lens"
aberrate - diverge from the expected; "The President aberrated from being a perfect gentleman"
belie, contradict, negate - be in contradiction with
differ - be different; "These two tests differ in only one respect"
conform - be similar, be in line with
3.deviate - cause to turn away from a previous or expected course; "The river was deviated to prevent flooding"
divert - send on a course or in a direction different from the planned or intended one
perturb - cause a celestial body to deviate from a theoretically regular orbital motion, especially as a result of interposed or extraordinary gravitational pull; "The orbits of these stars were perturbed by the passings of a comet"
perturb - disturb or interfere with the usual path of an electron or atom; "The electrons were perturbed by the passing ion"
shunt - provide with or divert by means of an electrical shunt
Adj.1.deviate - markedly different from an accepted norm; "aberrant behavior"; "deviant ideas"
abnormal, unnatural - not normal; not typical or usual or regular or conforming to a norm; "abnormal powers of concentration"; "abnormal amounts of rain"; "abnormal circumstances"; "an abnormal interest in food"

deviate

verb differ, vary, depart, part, turn, bend, drift, wander, stray, veer, swerve, meander, diverge, digress, turn aside He didn't deviate from his schedule.

deviate

verb
1. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
2. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
3. To change the direction or course of:
noun
One whose sexual behavior differs from the accepted norm:
Translations
يَنْحَرِف
odchýlit se
afvige
víkja frá, bregîa út af
nukrypimas
novirzīties
sapmak

deviate

[ˈdiːvɪeɪt] VIdesviarse (from de)

deviate

[ˈdiːvieɪt] vi
to deviate from [+ path, task, standard] → dévier de

deviate

vi
(person: from truth, former statement, routine) → abweichen (from von)
(ship, plane, projectile)vom Kurs abweichen or abkommen; (deliberately) → vom Kurs abgehen

deviate

[ˈdiːvɪˌeɪt] vi to deviate (from)deviare (da)

deviate

(ˈdiːvieit) verb
to turn aside, especially from a right, normal or standard course. She will not deviate from her routine.
ˌdeviˈation noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The ISIL security forces call the Tunisian gunmen as Khawarej (deviators), blaming them for disobeying the Caliph, the daily said.
Delivering hate speeches, sermons and declaring opponents as infidels and deviators is quite unsolicited and this is derailing and deviating (us from) our movement against occupants.'
The deviators among the people of the qiblah [ie, Muslims] see those whom they revere, whether it be the Prophet (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam) or another prophet.
where [l.sub.e] = L/(1+N/2), in which L is the length of tendon between anchorages or fully bonded deviators and N is the number of support hinges required to form a failure mechanism crossed by the tendon, [d.sub.p] is distance from the extreme compression fiber to the centroid of the prestressing steel, and c is the neutral axis depth.
The persons who store the sources of production are deviators from the Deen.
"Homosexuals are not deviating from Islam," he said."Homosexuality is a grave sin, but those who say that homosexuals deviate from Islam are the real deviators.
So within the contact domain of the impactor with the viscoelastic target, we would preassign this connectedness between the deviators of stress [sigma]' and strain [epsilon]' by the standard linear solid model involving fractional derivatives [12], that is,
[S.sub.1], [S.sub.2] and [S.sub.3] are principal stress deviators, [[sigma].sub.1], [[sigma].sub.2] and [[sigma].sub.3] are the principle stresses and [J.sub.2] is the second stress invariant of the stress deviator tensor.
Introducing the strain and stress deviators from (12) and (15) respectively from Millette [2], this equation becomes