mandrake

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man·drake

 (măn′drāk′)
n.
1.
a. A southern European plant (Mandragora officinarum) in the nightshade family, having greenish-yellow flowers and a branched root. This plant was once believed to have magical powers because its root resembles the human body.
b. The root of this plant, which contains the poisonous alkaloid hyoscyamine. In both senses also called mandragora.
2. See mayapple.

[Middle English, alteration (influenced by drake, dragon) of mandragora, from Old English, from Latin mandragorās, from Greek, of unknown origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mandrake

(ˈmændreɪk) or

mandragora

n
1. (Plants) a Eurasian solanaceous plant, Mandragora officinarum, with purplish flowers and a forked root. It was formerly thought to have magic powers and a narcotic was prepared from its root
2. (Plants) another name for the May apple
[C14: probably via Middle Dutch from Latin mandragoras (whence Old English mandragora), from Greek. The form mandrake was probably adopted through folk etymology, because of the allegedly human appearance of the root and because drake (dragon) suggested magical powers]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

man•drake

(ˈmæn dreɪk, -drɪk)

n.
1. a narcotic, short-stemmed European plant, Mandragora officinarum, of the nightshade family, having a fleshy, often forked root somewhat resembling a human form.
[1275–1325; alter. of mandrage (taken by folk etym. as man + drake2 in sense “dragon”), probably < Middle Dutch < Medieval Latin mandragora mandragora]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mandrake

A plant with a human-shaped root believed to have particularly magical qualities.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mandrake - the root of the mandrake plantmandrake - the root of the mandrake plant; used medicinally or as a narcotic
devil's apples, Mandragora officinarum, mandrake - a plant of southern Europe and North Africa having purple flowers, yellow fruits and a forked root formerly thought to have magical powers
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
2.mandrake - a plant of southern Europe and North Africa having purple flowers, yellow fruits and a forked root formerly thought to have magical powersmandrake - a plant of southern Europe and North Africa having purple flowers, yellow fruits and a forked root formerly thought to have magical powers
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Mandragora, Mandragora - a genus of stemless herbs of the family Solanaceae
mandrake, mandrake root - the root of the mandrake plant; used medicinally or as a narcotic
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mandrake
alraunabunovinamandragoranadliška
mandragora
mandragora
alraunamandragora
alraunabunovinamandragoranadliškaалрауна

mandrake

[ˈmændreɪk] Nmandrágora f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mandrake

nMandragore f; mandrake rootAlraune f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
As I sit and think about it, aside from a bunch of Aztecs who no longer exist and had a very faulty calendar, most of the end-of-the-world prophecies come from the USA, where they believe in that sort of stuff, as well as the Devil's testicles being made out of chocolate.
The Easter weekend will come and go with or without an earthquake that destroys Namibia and with or without the devil's testicles. Enjoy that thought and drive safely to avoid your own personal apocalypse.