devilfish


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dev·il·fish

 (dĕv′əl-fĭsh′)
n. pl. devilfish or dev·il·fish·es
Any of various aquatic animals having hornlike appendages on the head or thought to have a sinister appearance, including the devil rays, the manta, and certain octopuses and squids.

devilfish

(ˈdɛvəlˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
1. (Animals) Also called: devil ray another name for manta1
2. (Animals) another name for octopus

man•ta

(ˈmæn tə, ˈmɑn-)

n., pl. -tas.
1. (in Spain and Spanish America) a cloak or wrap.
2. Also called man′ta ray`, devilfish. any warm-water ray of the family Mobulidae, esp. of the genus Manta, measuring up to 24 ft. (7.3 m) across.
[1690–1700; < Sp: blanket]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.devilfish - medium-sized greyish-black whale of the northern Pacificdevilfish - medium-sized greyish-black whale of the northern Pacific
baleen whale, whalebone whale - whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
Eschrichtius, genus Eschrichtius - type and sole genus of the Eschrichtiidae
2.devilfish - bottom-living cephalopod having a soft oval body with eight long tentacles
octopod - a cephalopod with eight arms but lacking an internal shell
genus Octopus - type genus of the family Octopodidae
octopus - tentacles of octopus prepared as food
3.devilfish - extremely large pelagic tropical ray that feeds on plankton and small fishesdevilfish - extremely large pelagic tropical ray that feeds on plankton and small fishes; usually harmless but its size make it dangerous if harpooned
ray - cartilaginous fishes having horizontally flattened bodies and enlarged winglike pectoral fins with gills on the underside; most swim by moving the pectoral fins
family Mobulidae, Mobulidae - large rays lacking venomous spines: mantas
Atlantic manta, Manta birostris - largest manta (to 22 feet across wings); found worldwide but common in Gulf of Mexico and along southern coasts of United States; primarily oceanic
devil ray, Mobula hypostoma - small manta (to 4 feet) that travels in schools
Translations

devilfish

[ˈdevlfɪʃ] N (devilfish or devilfishes (pl)) → raya f, manta f
References in classic literature ?
They had not intended to spend the afternoon, but found themselves too fascinated to turn away from the breakers bursting upon the rocks and from the many kinds of colorful sea life starfish, crabs, mussels, sea anemones, and, once, in a rock-pool, a small devilfish that chilled their blood when it cast the hooded net of its body around the small crabs they tossed to it.
The title is misleading, because it immediately conjures images of something massive, such as a white shark, devilfish, whale, or other leviathan.
Driven forward by powerful beats of wing-like pectoral fins, these filter feeders search the waters for prey, their horn-like head fins giving rise to ancient mariners' tales of fearsome devilfish dragging boats into the ocean depths.
Popular areas this month will include the vicinity of the powerlines in Pine Island Sound and around Devilfish Key in Gasparilla Sound, but you might find these fish just about anywhere.
During the ceremony, the Sailors symbolically stood next to one of the two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters currently embarked as part of the San Diego-based Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 49 detachment, the "Devilfish." In the same ceremony, nine members of HSM49 Detachment 4, the "Scorpions," received their own designation as Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists.
Ex pawnbroker and jailbird from a Hull council estate, Devilfish became one of Britain's most successful poker players, netting himself around PS4million.
Do boldly in full view of all what another would not do in secret; choose the most ridiculous aways of satisfying your lust; and at the last, if you like, eat a raw devilfish or squid, and die.
Former world poker champion Dave 'Devilfish' Ulliott, who went from living in ' a council block to the penthouse suites of Sin City died after losing his short battle with cancer.
Former world poker champion Dave "Devilfish" Ulliott, who went from living in a council block to the penthouse suites of Sin City died after losing his short battle with cancer.
An array of exotic water creatures like golden apple snail and red devilfish are also on display.
The quatrain "Flea," for instance, treats the insect as an image of love's ambivalence: "Fleas--friends, even lovers / How cruel are those who suck / Our blood in loving us ..." (John Donne likewise drew a lesson, somewhat different, from the little bloodsucker.) The poem "Devilfish" acknowledges that the poet himself practices such vampirism.
The ships will also visit five wilderness areas -- Capitan Passage and Devilfish Bay in Tongass National Forest, Little Port Walter and Mist Cove, Patterson Bay and Deep Cove, The Brothers Islands and Frederick Sound, and Endicott Arm and FordOs Terror Wilderness.